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Brunnera macrophylla ‘Looking Glass’

Attaining 12-15″ in height and width.

Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’

A superb introduction, forming a clump of heart-shaped silver leaves, surrounded with mint green. Jack Frost should attain a height of 12-18″ and a width that’s similar.  Sprays of bright blue Forget-me-not flowers appear in mid to late spring. This is a superb collector’s plant and an easy-to-grow perennial that performs well in all but the driest of shady conditions. Excellent in the woodland garden. ‘Jack Frost’ handles more direct sun that most other variegated types of Brunnera, though in hot-summer regions some afternoon shade is recommended to prevent leaf scorch. Selected as the 2012 Perennial Plant of the Year by the Perennial Plant Association.

 

Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Slender Silhouette’

There is an age-old problem that almost all gardeners eventually have to face: Too many plants for too little space. For me, this realization happened five years ago, when I had reached the limit of how many trees I could plant in my rela­tively small yard. Still, I visited gardens across the country and saw new trees I liked, only to tell
myself, over and over again, that I simply did not have the space for another one. That was until I met ‘Slender Silhouette’ sweetgum and fell head over heels in love because it could fit almost anywhere. This is a compact, columnar tree with an impressive mature height of 40-50′ and a width of only 3 to 6 feet, so it takes up little precious space. Its great architectural form makes it a focal point like no other.

Unlike other sweetgums, which drop scores of macelike fruit all over the place, ‘Slender Silhouette’ only produces minimal fruit, which drop in a small area due to the tree’s narrow structure. This sweetgum’s foliage is deep green in summer and then turns yellow, orange, red, or burgundy in fall. It also tolerates a wide range of soils, including clay.

Betula platyphylla ‘Jefpark’ (Parkland Pillar Birch)

Parkland Pillar is a beautiful birch with a narrow, upright, dense habit. It boasts white bark and dense, dark green foliage that turns golden in late fall. This fast growing variety is suitable for gardens, screens or boulevards. Tolerant of heat, drought, and alkaline soils, Parkland Pillar is an excellent choice for urban landscapes. Its narrow form makes it perfect as an accent tree or it can be planted in multiples to form a privacy screen.  This tree has the potential to reach 40′ of height and 6-7′ of width at maturity.

Fagus sylvatica ‘Dawyck’ Purple Beech

Dawyck Purple Beech has attractive deep purple foliage which emerges coppery-bronze in spring. The serrated pointy leaves are ornamentally significant and turn an outstanding coppery-bronze in the fall. Neither the flowers nor the fruit are ornamentally significant. The smooth silver bark is extremely showy and adds significant winter interest.  Dawyck Purple Beech is a dense deciduous tree with a narrowly upright and columnar growth habit. Its average texture blends into the landscape, but can be balanced by one or two finer or coarser trees or shrubs for an effective composition.  This is a relatively low maintenance tree, and usually looks its best without pruning, although it will tolerate pruning. Deer don’t particularly care for this plant and will usually leave it alone in favor of tastier treats. It has no significant negative characteristics.  It can live to a ripe old age of 120 years old and has the potential to get 50′ tall though its rare to see them over 30′ in height.  As the original owner of the tree you could maybe expect to see 20′ in height with a 6′ spread.

Pyrus calleryana ‘Cleveland Select’ Pear

Perfectly uniform tree… great for front yards. Your neighbors will think that you get ladders out in the middle of the night and prune this tree.   It naturally grows in a tight, symmetrical shape. A semi-perfect oval. One of those miracles of nature. Its leaves fill in any gaps creating a near flawless surface area.  You often see these as a featured front yard tree or planted to line roads and entryways.  Best of all… every spring you’ll witness a long-lasting explosion of pure white flowers.  An exciting development in flowering pear trees – Cleveland Pears are a great improvement over Bradford Pears and Aristocrat Pears. You get that perfect, symmetrical oval shape in a much hardier, stronger tree.The Cleveland Pear hybrid resists damage from extreme snow, ice and wind.  Quickly grows to 30-40 ft. tall…an ideal size for small and medium sized yards.  They are very pest resistant as well, so there’s never any maintenance.  In the fall, the leaves turn from a deep summer green to a dark scarlet red.  If you’ve always wanted a flowering pear for your lawn and landscape, the Cleveland Pear is by   far the best variety.

Fagus sylvatica ‘Roseo-Marginata’ (Tri Color Beech)

I have to say this is perhaps my favorite tree, I just love it!  This tree is not for every yard but in my opinion every yard should take a look at having one of these trees.

It is Best grown in deep, rich, moist but well-drained soils in part shade. Plants do not perform well in the heat and humidity of the deep South. Variegated foliage may scorch in hot afternoon sun in the St. Louis area where sun dappled conditions with some afternoon shade may be best. Plants are intolerant of wet, poorly drained soils. Plants may be difficult to transplant. Plants do not always grow well in urban settings.

Noteworthy Characteristics

European beech is a large deciduous tree typically growing to 50-60’ (less frequently to 100’) tall with a dense, upright-oval to rounded-spreading crown. The bottom line is that tricolor beeches in general provide often stunning variegated foliage (purple/pink, green and white), particularly in spring. They are under story trees that typically grows to 30’ tall and from a distance usually project a rose foliage color in spring although the actual variegation is a bit more complicated. Leaves (to 4” long) have prominent parallel veins.  Yellowish green flowers bloom in April-May but are not showy.

Blue-Brown Flagstone

Oklahoma Blue-Brown Flagstone will bring a beautiful color palette of brown, gray, bluish-gray and rust to your outdoor living area. The colors match practically any color house.  Great for patios, walkways, pool coping, wall caps or fireplace and \hearths.  The slabs are approx: 1.5 -3″ thick and cover approx: 70-100 sq feet per ton.

Malus ‘Candymint’ Crabapple

‘Candymint’ originated in 1979 as a seedling of unknown parentage at the Simpson Orchard Company, Inc. of Vincennes, Indiana. It is a wide-spreading, horizontally-branched dwarf tree that grows 8 to 10 ft. tall and 12 to 15 ft. wide. Its leaves emerge deep purple with maroon veins and stems that remain reddish as the leaves mature to dark green. ‘Candymint’ has deep red buds that open to pink flowers with red marginal edges and ¼ in. deep purple fruits that persist into winter that attract birds. U.S. Plant Patent #6,606 issued February 16, 1989.

Acer rubrum ‘October Glory’ – Maple

One of the most popular red maple cultivars, the October Glory maple delivers on its name. The tree’s foliage holds a lustrous dark green color until later in the fall than most maples, but once the fall colors emerge, they burst forth boldly in shades of orange and red.   This beautiful shade tree would be an amazing addition to any yard.  The October Glory maple grows to a height of 40–50′ and a spread of around 35′ at maturity.

Astilbe chinensis ‘Amber Moon’

This bright beauty emerges in the spring on chartreuse yellow foliage with a tinge of red in spring.  As summer progresses the foliage turns to chartreuse green.  The tall blush red stems are topped with rosy pink flowers which are excellent for cutting.  this plant can reach 34-38″ of height with its long stemmed blooms.

Aralia cordata ‘Sun King’

This hardy tropical looking plant can brighten up that shaded spot with its large golden foliage.  Growing to 36″ tall, it blooms are tiny white flowers that give way to purple black berries in the fall.  In dense shade the foliage will take on a greener appearance.

Agastache ‘Bolero’

One of the longest blooming perennials in the garden.  Vivid rose purple flower spikes on bronze colored foliage set this perennial apart from others.  it grows to around 16-18″ and is both slug and deer resistant.  This plant is also fairly adapted to dry soils.

Hosta ‘Prairie Sky’

A favorite among blue Hostas! Powder blue, slightly cupped rounded leaves hold their showy color well all season. Prairie Sky can attain height’s around 12-15″ and a width of up to 36″.  Pale lavender flowers in mid to late summer.

Geranium cantabrigiense ‘Biokovo’

Biokovo Geranium features beautiful shell pink flowers with rose eyes at the ends of the stems from late spring to late summer, which are most effective when planted in groupings. The plant is very effective as a border plant and attains around 6-10″ height by 12-18″ of spread.  It’s deeply cut lobed palmate leaves are dark green in color. As an added bonus, the foliage turns a gorgeous Indian red in the fall.

Shenandoah Switch grass

Shenandoah Switch grass makes a small and neat 3′ tall clump. The foliage has a lovely, dark purple cast on its tips throughout the summer, but the real show begins in the fall as the foliage takes on a dark purple foliage.  This in combination with the airy plumes makes this grass a must have for every landscape.  Full sun allows for best coloration but the grass will tolerate part shade as well.

Golden Moneywort A.K.A Creeping Jenny

Golden Moneywort will grow to around 4-5 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches plus. Its foliage tends to remain low and dense as it hugs the ground. It grows very quickly, and under ideal conditions can become invasive if left unchecked for an extended period of time.  This perennial colors best in full sun but potentially can bleach out during the hottest times of summer in the Midwest.  Moneywort does well in partial shade and adds color to those shaded areas of the landscape as well.  It prefers average to moist conditions, and shouldn’t be allowed to dry out. It’s not particular with regard to soil type or pH.  It’s available in green and gold.

Malus ‘Perfect Purple’ Crab Apple

Malus ’Perfect Purple’ Perfect Purple Crab. Zone 3-9. 25’ tall, 15’ wide. Deep pink/purple flowers with glossy purple summer foliage. Bright red-orange fall foliage. Bright red persistent fruit that doesn’t fall off. Stays on all winter & is great food for winter & returning spring Robins when no other food is available.

Rosa ‘Easy Lemon Zest’ Rose

Features

Yellow flowers. Disease-resisant. Reblooming.

Best Seller
Continuous Bloom or Rebloomer
Long Blooming

Characteristics

Duration:  Shrub
Shrub Type:  Deciduous
Height Category: Medium
Garden Height: 18 – 30 Inches
Spacing: 18 – 36 Inches
Spread: 18 – 30 Inches
Flower Colors: Yellow
Foliage Colors: Green
Foliage Shade: Green
Habit: Mounded
Container Role: Thriller

Plant Needs

Light Requirement: Sun
Maintenance Category: Easy
Blooms On: New Wood
Bloom Time: Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer

Hardiness Zones:

5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Water Category:

Average

Uses:

Container

Landscape

Mass Planting

Specimen or Focal Point

Uses Notes:

Landscapes, containers

Maintenance Notes:

Prefers moist, well-drained soils. Pruning is generally not needed, but may be shaped in spring.  It does not need spraying.

Still think yellow roses are tough to grow?  Not this rebel!

We evaluated yellow roses for years, looking for one that lived up to our demands for brilliant color and excellent disease-resistance. This is it! Sunny, canary yellow flowers do not fade to white, and really light up against the glossy green foliage.  It is free-flowering, producing lots of buds which open to self-cleaning flowers. Excellent disease-resistance makes it easy for gardeners to enjoy.

Oso Easy® Lemon Zest Rosa ‘ChewHocan’ USPPAF, Can PBRAF

Acer ‘Hot Wings’ Maple

Thanks to Plant Select® for supplying this information” and a link to the site Plant Select

Hot Wings® Tatarian maple: a tree for all seasons

 

HOT WINGS® Tatarian maple is a superior small ornamental tree that was discovered  Colorado but destined for distribution throughout the country. The  natural range of Tatarian maple is from Southeastern Europe into Western Asia. It likely arrived in North America in the early 1900′s during the days of the U.S.  Department of Agriculture world-wide plant exploration. It started to appear in Colorado nurseries in the early 1980′s when regional nurserymen discovered this  maple was much more tolerant of our alkaline soils than other cold-hardy ornamental maples.

HOT WINGS® appeared as a chance-seedling found growing in the production fields of Fort Collins Wholesale Nursery at Fort Collins, CO in 1993. This  particular tree stood out from all the other Tatarian maples for six weeks every summer with its breath-taking scarlet red samaras (helicopters) contrasting with  the rich green foliage giving it an appearance of being in bloom. One of the employees said it reminded him of Christmas in July. In the spring, clusters of yellow-  white flowers cover the tree after the leaves appear. Fall leaf color transforms from orange-red on the outside of the tree to yellow in the middle. HOT WINGS®   also has strong branch unions making it less prone to storm breakage than other Tatarian maples. The horticulturists at Fort Collins Wholesale Nursery  recognized the superior qualities of this tree and decided to continue close observation. Plant Select® learned of the plant and after several years of continued  trials, agreed that this indeed was a superior tree, and offered to patent the tree and promote it.

 HOT WINGS® Tatarian Maple (Acer tataricum ‘Garann’ PP15023)

Large Shrub or Small Tree
Height: 15-18 feet
Width: 15-18 feet
Blooms: Spring bloom followed by brilliant red fruit
Sun: Full sun to partial shade
Soil Moisture: Moderate
Hardiness: USDA zones 4-10 (up to 7,000 feet)
Culture: Best performance on garden loam

Magnolia ‘Butterflies’

Butterflies Magnolia is a beautiful ornamental tree.  Light yellow 3-4″ blooms in April brighten any spring landscape.  The tree can reach 15-30′ in height with Nebraska conditions leaning towards the smaller eventual size.  Width is comparable at 12-20′.  The blooms are delicate and short lived if the tree is exposed to strong winds.  I recommend this tree to be planted in a protected back yard with good, rich organic soil.  Keep the roots from becoming waterlogged through berming the soil as well.

Here are some nice look at a contemporary fire pit and or patio area.

Whats your style?

Weston Wall Block Ideas

Here are several examples of what you can do with Weston Wall Block.  You might come to see why we prefer it to most of the other wall blocks.

Screened Porches Ideas

Here are some great examples of screened porches.  If you see an example of what you would like, just give us a call.  We prefer to do this type of work after our busy landscaping season slows down, closer to winter.  Lets us enclose your covered porch during our down time and save yourself some money at the same time.

A gallery of composite deck ideas

We feel the back bone of  every landscape is a great hardscape.  Most hardscapes involve the addition of one or more structures, may it be a deck, a gazebo, or even a pergola.  That being said, we expanded our skill sets to handle those types of projects.  The construction industry is seeing a great surge of new environmentally friendly products such as composite decking materials.  Here are a few deck ideas for you to contemplate when dreaming on your future outdoor environment.

Hardscaping vs Softscaping in the landscape

Hardscapes vs Softscapes

In the context of landscape management, hardscape and softscape essentially refer to the heavy or light landscape materials used respectively. While the stone, flagstone and rock are referred to as hardscape, trees, soil, flowerbeds, vegetable gardens, grass and shrubs comprise the softscape. A great combination of hardscape design and softscape decision guarantees a landscaping masterpiece. The difference between hardscaping and softscaping is the same as that between walls and wallpaper.

Continue this article:  Hardscapes vs Softscapes

Bartron-Stephanie-patio-pavers_lg[1]Softscaping

Garden Myths Busted: Vitamin B-1, Soil under Conifers, Peonies & Ants

Garden Myths Busted: Vitamin B-1, Soil under Conifers, Peonies & AntsBy Paul Rodman (paulgrowApril 16, 2013

Two horticultural professionals took some of the most popular garden myths into the university laboratory to prove or disprove the accuracy of these myths. Dr. Linda Chalker-Scott from Washington State University and Dr. Jeff Gilliam from the University of Minnesota tested these myths under controlled conditions to determine if they really work.
Gardening pictureThe MythVitamin B-1 stimulates root growth and revitalizes roots after transplanting. B-1 also speeds up root development of root systems on bare root plants such as roses and shrubs.
Continue this article:  Garden-Myth-Busting

Winter Pruning of Trees, A Timely Task

Most folks are putting away their gardening tools in late fall but don’t be so quick to retire inside for the winter. Did you know that winter is the perfect time to prune most deciduous trees?

Why winter?

There are several good reasons to prune trees in winter:

  • The foliage is gone and the structure of the branches is clearly visible.
  • The tree is dormant, this will eliminate the bleeding of sap from the fresh cuts.
  • In the case of oak trees they should only be pruned during the winter. This is due to the fact that freshly cut oaks emit an odor which attracts the beetle that causes oak wilt. This is a serious disease that often times will kill the tree. The beetles are hibernating during the winter.
  • There are several other varieties of tress that are less likely to contract diseases when pruned during the winter months. Prune locust to prevent stem canker. Prune apple, crab apple, mountain ash, and hawthorn to avoid fire blight.

Continue this article here:  Winter Pruning of Trees

John Deere Blade $400

Heavy Duty John Deere Blade.  360 degree swivel, in good shape

New Construction Guide: Steps one should follow during construction to maximize your outdoor construction dollar.

As a Landscape contractor and to an ever growing degree; a construction contractor, we encounter many different types of projects.  I feel our mind set of constantly striving towards maximizing our efficiency gives us an edge in the landscape sector.  Our broad skill set (which includes the likes of construction and other complimentary talents) gets us in the door on other outdoor projects.  This broader ranging skill set and the ability to do more as an individual contractor allows us to accomplish more than many of our competitors.  We’ve built value into our company by offering efficient broad ranged skills tailored to the outdoor environment.  This saves our customers money and allows them to get the proverbial “most bang for their buck”.  Most of our projects come down to that of new construction or renovation.  Today, I’d like to elaborate some, on the value of using one company for all or most of your outdoor needs.  For this discussion, I’d like to focus on new construction…

To finish reading click the link below

Steps to folow during new construction

Examples of Hidden Gardens

Here are some fine examples of hidden gardens.  They all gravitate to one unifying theme, privacy.  If your needing that special place to unwind than a hidden garden is right for you.  Privacy is generally attained through trees, fences and or walls in the case of metropolitan settings.  Think long and hard on your end goals and don’t hesitate to bring in a professional for some help with planning.

Pyrus ‘Jack’ Pear

Jack Pear is a smaller compact pear. Bright white flowers in the spring time. Green foliage through the growing season and then turning to yellow, orange or red depending on how the season went.  Jack Pear grows to 15′- 20′ tall by 8′- 10′ wide.

Picea Pungens, ‘Bacheri’

Bacheri is a smaller form of the blue spruce. It has tight silvery-blue needles. Bacheri can grow 12′-18′ tall by 6′-8′ wide. Nice little tree for your landscape needs.

Picea ‘Iseli’ Fastigiata (Columnar) Spruce

Iseli is a tight, narrow blue spruce tree. It has a nice blue tint to the needles. It can grow 35′- 40′ tall by 10′ wide. Iseli is a tree that can fill and nice tight area and still add that nice blue color to your landscape.

Acer ‘Bloodgood’ Maple

Here is a red foliage tree for that right spot in your yard. Likes sun to part shade. Bloodgood can grow to 15′-20′ tall by 15′-20′ wide. This can be the right tree with well drained soil and the right sun light.

Populus ‘Prairie Gold’ Aspen

Prairie Gold Aspen a native tree to Nebraska.  The Prairie Gold Aspen is adapted to the drought, heat and humidity of the Nebraska Prairie. It has good disease resistance to leaf spot. The leaves rustle in the wind adding both visual interest and soothing sound. The leaves turn yellow in the fall. The tree can grow to 35′- 40′ tall and 15′- 20′ wide. Can be either a single stem or a multi-stem tree.

Picea ‘Baby Blue Eyes’ Dwarf blue spruce

Excellent dwarf blue spruce, if not one of the best.  It’s foliage is an intense baby blue on the new growth and throughout most of the season.  As a dwarf, one could expect 15-20 ft. height (20 years) and 8-12 ft. width.  This tree grows about 8-10 inches per year, which is considerably slower than it’s cousin the blue spruce.  A great tree for the yard with limited space and paired nicely with single story homes that don’t have the scale to handle huge trees.

Amelanchier ‘Robin Hill’ Serviceberry

Here is a columnar ornamental tree that has brilliant white flowers in the spring time and yellowish-orange fall color. The tree gets 15′-25′ tall and 10-15′ wide.

Populus Swedish (Columnar) Aspen

Here is a columnar tree that has yellowish fall color. Small leaves flutter and rustle in the breeze providing both visual interest and soothing sound . Silver bark color to add another visual interest. The tree is 20′-30 tall and 5-10′ wide. Great little tree for that tight spot to fill.

Cornus Mas a.k.a Cornelian cherry

This is a nice ornamental tree that can be placed close to the home as a foundation planting.  The mature height is around 15-20′ with a spread of equal values.  The tree is one of the first to bloom with the approach of spring.  Cornus Mas or Cornelian Cherry as it is sometimes called can bloom as early as March.  It’s bright yellow blossoms light up the landscape and let one know, that spring is just around the corner.  This tree offers a pleasing fall color display that can range from maroons and reds to yellows.  It’s fruit is very edible and quite tasty.  Those of you into Jam and or wine could readily acquire a new ingredient!

Pinus strobiformus (South Western White Pine)

Our growers keep suggesting that we try this pine as a replacement to the standard Eastern White Pine.  The tree is said to stay somewhat shorter and narrower than the Eastern white Pine while being more resistant to winter burn.  With that being said, we have begun using them as a substitute to White Pines at times.  There seems to be some differing discussion as to the mature size of the tree.  If I go with the consensus, you should expect around 30-50′ of height and 20-30′ of width.  I love the White Pine and look forward to using this SW White Pine as the new and improved version.  As the Scotch Pines die off, we will be looking for new options for a fast growing, reliable evergreen.

Dalton project

We took this back yard to the next level last fall 2014′.  We removed the concrete, added large pavers a sitting wall and this nice fire pit kit.  We utilized Lumberman’s and Outdoor Solutions as our material suppliers on this joint project.  We made a friend along the way as well!

Custom fort with slide and rock climbing wall

We had fun on this project.  Rather than mowing a challenging slope, our customer went with a play area for the kids and took the mowing out of play.  Snap steps complement the bouldered bank, allowing for a more manageable elevation change.  Fun project.  Still needs a water cannon though!

Keep in mind we are capable of more than just landscaping!  We handle projects from decks and pergolas to garages and small additions.  We offer special pricing for those of you whom are willing to wait till our off season (December – March).

Needle Cast

Tree problems can be very sneaky. A lot of the time they creep in, and before you know it, the problem is staring you in the face, demanding attention. One of the most common diseases we see here in Nebraska with Colorado spruce are the tree’s needles turning purple and eventually falling from the tree. In a word, the trees look horrible. Sometimes the problem is localized; sometimes it seems to be entire trees.

The problem appears to be a fungal disease called Rhizosphaera needle cast, caused by the fungus Rhizosphaera kalkhoffii. It is a disease that affects spruce trees, and Colorado blue spruce happens to be the spruce considered to be most susceptible to this disease.

Infection typically begins in the lower branches of the tree, because this is the part of the tree most likely to have longer periods of wet conditions which favor fungal growth. The wet springs we have had were a wonderful opportunity for Rhizosphaera to thrive. It typically infects the needles of spruce trees in May and June, but it takes at least until late the following fall or even the next spring for there to be noticeable symptoms.

Infected needles first appear purple, then brown and drop from the tree. Inspection of the infected needles with a magnifying glass usually reveals black spots in rows down the length of the needle. These are called the fruiting bodies of the Rhizosphaera fungus—the structures of the fungus that produce spores.

Rain splashes, sprinklers, or even when hand watering, the water will splash the spores onto healthy needles and helps the fungus spread to more parts of the tree. It’s very easy to overlook a lower branch or two that is affected by Rhizosphaera, but after a year or two, when the disease has spread to multiple branches, it’s harder to miss. This is why everyone is taking notice of their trees now. The disease has simply had enough time to spread and make its presence known.

In severely infected trees, branches will have new green needles on the tips of branches, and purple, brown, or even no needles further back on the branch. Pruning out the affected branches may seem logical, but it’s not always the best option, as Colorado blue spruce doesn’t typically regrow new branches in the affected area.

While you can’t reverse the damage from this disease, you can control its spread. Recommended management of Rhizosphaera needle cast is applying a fungicide containing chlorothalonil when the new needles are half elongated, and again when they reach full size. Also, rake up and remove as many infected needles as possible, to remove sources of the fungus.

Picea abies ‘Cupressina’ (Columnar Norway)

Excellent narrow upright evergreen attaining 5′ in width and 20-25′ in height over time.  This is a fairly slow growing tree.  They like to keep there feet on the dryer side so avoid over watering.

Interloc Edgers 3-3/8″ x 12″ x 3-3/8″

We also utilize these types of concrete brick edgers.  They are essentially what we go to if the bed is going to have some curvature to it.  The colors represented below by the pictures are:  Gray, Red, Red/Black, and Tan.

Note:  these can be damaged by riding lawn mowers as well.

Belgian Tumbled Edger

We utilize these as needed on essentially linear (straight lined beds) beds.

They measure 4 1/2″ x 12″ x 3 1/2″ and are made of concrete.  They work nicely when you are after a more stylish edge than that of plastic edging.  They come in (4) colors which are represented below as:  Autumn Blend, Quarry Gray, Sienna, and Tan.  Note:  heavy riding lawn mowers can alter or move these over time.

Unique Fencing Ideas

Here are a few ideas for non traditional fencing.  Some would be perfect for kids others are merely an inexpensive way to keep those precious gardens free from unwanted pests.

LED Retrofit bulbs are available. Upgrade your conventional outdoor lighting system and SAVE THE PLANET!

G4 Bipin LED – Dynasty
(1.5W; Replaces 15-Watt Halogen) 
 
The Dynasty® G4 Bipin LED lamp is designed specifically for landscape lighting retrofit. This compact LED utilizes CAO Group’s patented High-Flux LED and also features a multi-directional beam pattern. This bipin is energy efficient, water resistant. Ideal for pathway lighting fixtures.
 
Specifications/Features:
  • Engineered for landscape lighting fixtures
  • 1.5 Watts
  • 100 Lumens
  • 8-24VAC
  • Includes T-5 Wedge Adapter
  • Available in 2700 & 5700 Kelvin Temperatures, as well as Red, Green, Blue, & Amber
  • CRI: 85
  • Nichia Chipset
  • 35,000 Hour Lamp Life
  • Conformal-Coated PC Board
  • Dimmable with most magnetic transformers
  • 5-Year Warranty
Brilliance LED MR-16  
(4W; Replaces 20-Watt Halogen)
(5W; Replaces 35-Watt Halogen)
(7W; Replaces 50-Watt Halogen) 
 
Description:
Our 4th Generation Brilliance LED MR-16 LED lamp has been redesigned to better fit into standard, low voltage, fixtures. These LED’s are thermally engineered to operate in enclosed fixtures, and they also feature our own enhanced ESD (Electro-Static Discharge) Protection (IEC-61000-4-2), as well as our own built-in Heat Overload Protection Technology – which gives you added security by automatically cooling down (and reducing lumens output) only when exposed to extreme heat (air temperatures above 125ºF). Best of all, there is no color shift when lumens output is reduced, and overall lamp life is improved. When extreme temperatures drop below 125ºF, full lumens output will automatically resume.
 
Specifications/Features:
  • Built-In Heat Overload Protection Technology
  • UL Listed & FCC Compliant
  • Available in 2200, 2700, 3000, & 5700 Kelvin Temperatures, as well as Red, Green, Blue, & Amber (Colors available in 4-Watt & 5-Watt only)
  • Available in 15º, 30º, & 60º Beam Angles
  • Available in 4 Watts, 5 Watts, & 7 Watts
  • 8-25VAC
  • Maximum Current – 4W: 0.6A; 5W: 0.8A; 7W: 1.2A
  • CRI: 85
  • CREE Chipset
  • 50,000 Hours Lamp Life
  • Fully Potted PC Board
  • Dimmable with most magnetic transformers
  • 5-Year Warranty
  • Patent Pending

Picea glauca ‘Pendula’ (Weeping White Spruce)

Excellent narrow evergreen specimen plant.  A relatively slow grower, this tree can reach heights of 20-30 feet with an eventual width of 6 feet.  Good drought and heat tolerance are additional bonuses to this tree.  It doesn’t like it’s feet to stay wet so avoid overly moist locations.  It’s only negative is it’s cost, they are a bit pricey due to its slow growth rate and limited availability.

FIRE PITS AND FIRE PLACES – LINK

Hello folks here is a great link to many of the fire pits and or fire places offered here in the Lincoln area.  If you see something you like contact Outdoor Solutions or us if a complete turn key installation is in order.  Another option would be to go directly to  Belgard’s website.  You will find many idea’s and options for your dream yard get away!

 

Materials Conversion Chart

Information to help you with planning your project.

Gravel or Sand Coverage per Ton:

  • 1″ Depth = 220 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Ton of Material
  • 2″ Depth = 110 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Ton of Material
  • 3″ Depth =  73 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Ton of Material
  • 6″ Depth =  36 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Ton of Material
  • 9″ Depth =  24 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Ton of Material

Topsoil/Compost Coverage per Ton:

  • 1″ Depth = 300 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Ton of Material
  • 2″ Depth = 150 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Ton of Material
  • 3″ Depth = 100 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Ton of Material
  • 4″ Depth =  75 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Ton of Material

Mulch or Topdessing Coverage per Cubic Yard:

  • 1″ Depth = 324 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Cubic Yard of Material
  • 2″ Depth = 163 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Cubic Yard of Material
  • 3″ Depth = 108 S.F. coverage = Approximately 1 Cubic Yard of Material

Wallstone, Boulders and Flagstone:

  • Drywall Loose fit Stone:  12 to 15 face feet per ton or (1 ton will build a wall of approximately 1’x1’x15′)
  • Boulders for purpose of retaining soil (boulder wall):  5 face feet per ton
  • Granite boulders range 150-200 lb’s per cubic foot.  (there fore a roundish boulder of 2’x2’x3′ could weigh approximately 1 ton)
  • Flagstone 1″ thick = about 13 pounds per square foot (approximately 150 square feet per ton)
  • Flagstone 1.5″ thick = about 20 pounds per square foot (approximately 100 square feet per ton)
  • Flagstone 2″ thick = about 27 pounds per square foot (approximately 74 square feet per ton)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malus ‘Royal Raindrops’ Crabapple

Perhaps my new favorite ornamental tree!  This crab attains 15-20′ in height with a 12-15′ width.  The tree has an upright spreading habit.  It blooms a bright pink in spring, with burgundy foliage persisting through the season.  The foliage changes to an amber orange red in fall.  It’s fruit are 1/4″ in size and are persistent through the winter months.  The foliage is a cut/serrated leaf that doesn’t resemble the same foliage as most other crabs.  I like to use it as a replacement to Japanese Maples in situations where a more hardy and durable tree is warranted.  It also offers great disease resistance, I just can’t say enough about this tree.

Composite Decks

Composite decks are another skill set we offer.  Composite has come along ways!  With so many colors and features it’s hard to beat.  To some it’s cost prohibitive as the over all materials cost is almost twice that of Pressure treated.  At the same time, it’s longevity is tough to beat.  A well built composite deck can last 20-30 years with no painting or staining!

I feel it only makes sense to combine all of your outdoor projects under one roof when ever possible.  It comes down to a good product for a fair price.  We at Landmark Landscapes are making good on that philosophy.  By contracting with us you can combine a landscape, hardscape, deck, fence and outdoor lighting project all in one turn key package.  By combining various small to large projects into one comprehensive plan and or project, we can offer a better price and keep all of the tasks running on a smooth schedule.  This makes life for you new construction home owners a breeze and stretches your dollar.  Call us today to schedule a free consultation.

Cedar Platform Deck

We enjoy building quality decks.  Cedar is still our preferred medium of choice but we also build decks in pressure treated Pine and Composite.  This particular deck (Cedar) has metal spindles and wrap around steps.  The deck transitions down to a cobblestone look of patio pavers.

Watering Guide Line

Watering Guideline 

Good watering habits is perhaps the most important factor in determining your new landscapes success. 
During establishment (first year in the ground), they should be monitored closely so they do not 
dry out. 

High temperatures in conjunction with winds can really do a number on your new plantings.  If you are unsure as to if the plant needs water, you simply need to check it.  You do this by pulling back the mulch at the base of the plant in question.  Using your finger, feel how wet the soil is.  The soil should be moist and cool to the touch, not just on the surface, but a couple of inches down as well. Too much water can be just as bad for the plant.  Too much water, on a consistent basis can cause root rot (this can kill the plant in time) which shows as a wilted appearance as well.  A dry wilt is always better than a wet wilt.  Bottom line, only water when you know it’s needed.  A plant will tell you when it is thirsty by the way it looks.  Good indicators of dry plant conditions are if the plant is wilting, saggy, or worst case, crispy to the touch.
I think it’s fairly tough to over water the plants on the first month, so plan on watering 2x per week during those first 4 weeks.  After the first month, back it down to at least 1x per week for the next 5-8 weeks.  Again, do not over water; this can happen easily in clay soils.   Remember to use the method above to check the plants if unsure.  Monitor the weather and your plants.  If we are experiencing hot drying winds then chances are good the plants are going to be thirsty.  Plants with large leaves, loose moisture more readily than those plants that have small leaves or needles (in the case of evergreens).  Those large leafed plants can become your indicator plants.  As they show signs of dryness first, you can simply monitor them and when they start to wilt, a watering session is needed for all the large leafy varieties.  You will find out that ground covers, Evergreens and grasses generally can go longer between watering’s.  Again it all comes down to knowing your plants.

Hand watering with a low pressure hose is best as you can direct the water to the roots. Overhead 
watering with a sprinkler is not usually recommended. Overhead sprinklers are typically set to water 
turf, which requires a different rate of watering than landscaping plants. Unless you have a zone in 
your sprinkler system set up for the landscaping beds specifically, you will need to water your 
landscaping plants by hand.  Keep in mind, after the first month or so they will be less susceptible to under watering. If you do not have the time to water or simply are not interested in that aspect of yard maintenance then a sprinkler system in your beds may be warranted.  Talk to us about installing a drip system, we can give you an estimate.

Trees especially need deep watering, usually once per week is sufficient. As always check the soil 
before watering.  Leaving a hose on at 20% flow for half an hour is a good way to deep water a tree.

Mulching:  A 2 to 3 inch layer of mulch is very beneficial around all trees and plants.  Do not “bury” your plants with the mulch; keep a bowl of mulch around the plant so it is not riding up on the plant stalk or trunk.  Mulch will hold moisture and reduce temperature extremes in the soil.  Keep that mulch level constant.  During spring maintenance season, it’s very common for us to top dress the mulch, returning the level to that of 2-3 inches.

Mark Charipar

President, Landmark Landscapes

Here are some wonderful pictures of an amazing G Scale (Garden Scale) Railroad here in Lincoln, NE

These photo’s are from a very nice local G Scale Railroad here in Lincoln.  Note:  The shots were taken this winter.  With any luck I will be adding some photo’s of the set when it comes to life this spring.

Here are a few pictures of model railroads. I’ve been apart in,some are from my very own set.

Model railroading is a genuinely rewarding hobby.  It requires patience and attention to detail.  I will add to this post from time to time with additional pictures.  Here are some shots from my layout in HO scale.

Featured Project

Well folks it would seem as though we are finally, caught up!!!  We are running some nice specials on fall tree plantings.  Right now we have real good turn around time on any projects involving plantings as the weather can change on a dime.  I’ve included a before and almost after picture of a project we did just last month.  It involved replacing the existing decks with an elevated patio of pavers and veneered block walls.  We added a bubbler boulder feature, lighting, and irrigation so the pots can now be readily watered even when they are traveling.  We did all the work in house!  We are just finding, that it’s far simpler and easier to schedule if we do it ourselves and the quality can be controlled as well.  Big box landscape companies sub most of the construction work if not all of it out.  Every contractor adds something to the final price and in the end the quality sometimes just doesn’t seem to add up to the price.  We can remedy all of that by doing the entire project under one roof.  Call us and see why we keep turning out smiles.

We are more than just landscaping these days!  As winter draws near, we will again be booking internal construction projects.  We offer great prices through our off season and the attention to detail is still there.  Click on our construction tab for a listing of our offered services.

If your planning a new construction project please read my blog on new construction with the provided link below.

See the blog page here.

New Construction Guide: Steps one should follow during construction to maximize your outdoor construction dollar.

As a Landscape contractor and to an ever growing degree; a construction contractor, we encounter many different types of projects.  I feel our mind set of constantly striving towards maximizing our efficiency gives us an edge in the landscape sector.  Our broad skill set (which includes the likes of construction and other complimentary talents) gets us in the door on other outdoor projects.  This broader ranging skill set and the ability to do more as an individual contractor allows us to accomplish more than many of our competitors.  We’ve built value into our company by offering efficient broad ranged skills tailored to the outdoor environment.  This saves our customers money and allows them to get the proverbial “most bang for their buck”.  Most of our projects come down to that of new construction or renovation.  Today, I’d like to elaborate some, on the value of using one company for all or most of your outdoor needs.  For this discussion, I’d like to focus on new construction.

On any given new construction project, the home owner is faced with a myriad of decisions and options.  This is compounded by the fact that many of them must flow in a certain order if maximum efficiency is to be attained.  Efficiency translates to lowered costs.  I’ve arrived at estimates where the home owner is excited to share their ideas with me as to the dream landscape they’ve always wanted.  I listen painfully as they describe boulders, patios and berms with lighted large caliper trees.  Inside I’m screaming.  I think of the heavy equipment it’s going to require to perform such a task and before me is a newly sodded yard surrounding a home with a 3′ landscape bed.   As they describe the dream, I think on the reality of the situation.  The reality is they have just wasted countless dollars and reduced the budget for creating the dream by lack of planning and coordination.   Sod and sprinklers will need to be moved or thrown away all together.  Heavy equipment which could have radically sped up the project is now out of play or at least going to cause needless damage to the existing turf.  Wiring for outdoor lighting has been left out and the cost has now doubled to install it.  These situations can almost exclusively be avoided by simply hiring the right company to coordinate the entire process.  Here are my suggestions on handling at least the outdoor aspects on a typical new home:

New Construction Guide:  Steps one should follow during construction to maximize your outdoor construction dollar.

1.  Planning:  Get a plan or two for that matter.  I can’t elaborate enough just how important this part is!!!  Some landscape companies offer scaled drawings and or picture graphics software that provide you with a vision of what your outdoor environment can or will look like.  This plan should be comprehensive and include those other elements that you plan on introducing into your outdoor environment.  An example would be:  fences, decks, patios, walkways, Retaining walls, utility sheds, fire pits, water features, outdoor kitchens, or special activities area’s (ex. a playground).  These are but a few of the projects that can be added to the outdoor environment.  I’ve been on many projects where builders coordinate some of these outdoor projects and I’ve seen different levels of success under these situations.  The bottom line is getting a plan.  You need to feel comfortable that your landscape contractor has your best interests in mind (aesthetically, functionally and financially).

2.  Concrete:  During the planning phase, a good landscape designer may alter or enhance the shape and flow of concrete walkways, drives and or patios.  The concrete can often be utilized to accent the landscape beds creating a nice comfortable flow throughout the entire project.  Understand that by adding curves and or square footage to the project you have the potential to see a higher price on that portion of the job as well.  It’s always best to ask, I’ve found that generally the cost is nominal and the reward great.

3.  Down spouts:  When discussing concrete, it’s important to think about your down spouts around the home.  Down spouts are occasionally disregarded, home owners can be left with a 4-6′ extension that requires you to flip them up each time the mower’s used.  In some situations, a down spout is placed right next to a walkway, this allows winter melt off from the roof to turn around and freeze on the side walk creating a slipping hazard.  Today, home owners have the option of in ground drainage systems.  This system takes water from the down spout’s and moves water away from the home underground via PVC or corrugated pipe.   The pipes can be day lighted (camouflaged yet openly exposed) into landscape beds or terminated via drain basins located in the turf.   Drain basins need to be drilled at the base and covered on top to prevent critters from entering and plugging your lines.  The covers are needed to avoid a nasty ankle sprain as well.  I recommend dispersion plates as covers over popups, they are easier to maintain where large numbers of leaves may fall.  In areas with large mature trees close to the home, I’d even consider adding leaf guards to the gutters.  Down spouts can be ascetically pleasing as well.  We have utilized rubber liner to create dry creek beds to transfer water; this works well and adds interest to the landscape.

Keep in mind, pipes are buried and buried pipes go in much easier if the concrete is not present at the time of installation.  Again a good landscape designer will guide you through this process and should coordinate with the builder to make sure this step isn’t forgotten.

3.  Drainage:  Rough grade the property and add soil to the landscape beds where needed.  This area is often overlooked, creating future problems in the landscape and even going as far as to see water damage to the home itself.  The key words here are positive drainage.  Water needs to move away from the home and easily find its way to the property lines.  This same concept needs to work through the landscape beds.  In heavy soils, such as those we work with here in Lincoln NE, soil is often added in the form of berming and or contouring.  Nursery stock depending on its variety often requires far less moisture than that of turf.  Berming and or mounding the soil (in an aesthetic manner of course) not only allows the plant material to grow in better soil.  It also allows us to shed water away from those plants that tend to dislike high moisture growing conditions.  Some landscape companies sub out the grading others are all inclusive.  The bottom line again here is that your landscape contractor should be a part of this phase of the project.

4.  Walls:  Retaining walls and or stone work should occur next.  With the grade for the most part being established in the rough grade, it’s time to build walls and incorporate stone features such as boulders.  Granted in some situations, retaining walls may actually supersede this step.  Quite frankly, it comes down to the situation and access to the wall and or stone portion of the project.  Retaining wall blocks and boulders are heavy.  Most of the equipment utilized to install those features is heavy as well.  Your landscape contractor needs to coordinate this step of the project to avoid future conflicts.  I’ve arrived at estimates where the home owner is excited to share their ideas with me as to the dream landscape they’ve always wanted.  I listen as they describe boulders, patios and berms with lighted large caliper trees.  Inside I’m screaming.  I think of the heavy equipment it’s going to require to perform such a task and before me is a newly sodded yard, surrounding a home with a 3′ landscape bed.   As they describe the dream, I think on the reality of the situation.  The reality is, they have just wasted countless dollars and reduced the budget for creating the dream by lack of planning and coordination.   Sod and sprinklers will need to be moved or thrown away all together.  Heavy equipment which could have radically sped up the project is now out of play or at least going to cause needless damage to the existing turf.  Wiring for outdoor lighting has been left out and the cost has now doubled to install it.  These situations can almost exclusively be avoided by simply hiring the right company to coordinate the entire process.

5.  Structures, buried services, landscape beds and low voltage wiring:  These items (assuming you’ve budgeted for them) are the next step in finishing the outdoor portion of your new home.  Structures fall under a board heading in my book.  Structures, features or special needs areas can evoke many examples; some would include decks, fences, gazebo’s, playhouses, storage sheds, patios, fire pits, outdoor kitchens, etc.  We want those structures or features that affect irrigation, fencing, and or landscaping to be placed now.  These features should have been mentioned earlier during the planning and designing phase.  A good designer would have thought this portion through carefully.  I always try to place those structures in the landscape beds when available.  You will lesson trimming and shorten the overall mow time on your home. If some of these features are to be added later, still consider the cost advantages of adding the service’s (such as gas lines, water lines, or wiring) now.  If you know where the fire pit is to reside then install the gas line now.  Pipe installation is far less costly if it can occur prior to a finished yard.  A finished yard could require hand digging of gas lines or electrical services.  Regardless of how it’s done, repair on irrigation systems and or turf are generally inevitable.  Low voltage lighting allows for wiring to be placed right at the surface of the soil.  If outdoor lighting is on your radar as a future addition, I’d recommend adding the wiring now as well.  The wire and subsequent labor to install it is fairly inexpensive if you catch it now.  Adding wire to an existing bed covered in mulch or for that matter weed barrier and rock is a real pain in the back side, as it adds labor and needless clean up to the process.

At Landmark, we like to package fencing into our overall outdoor package.  It only makes sense for us to install the fence as we build the other outdoor structures in conjunction with the landscape beds.  I generally like to see the fence go in prior to any type of irrigation.  The fence is fairly rigid as to its position on the property.  On many occasions, the fence line is going to follow the property line.  Unfortunately, the irrigation contractor may be thinking that same thought.  The last thing you want is for the fence contractor to drop posts all along (or on top of) your irrigation lines.  It’s best to have the fence in place and then a good irrigation contractor can run parallel to the fence and install the heads as needed.  Keep in mind structures, fencing and landscaping directly influence the coverage of an irrigation system.  Once again, that’s where I think its best that landscaping and fencing both come prior to the irrigation system.

We also recommend installing the landscape beds prior to sprinkler installation (next step).  Landscape beds are essentially those spaces ear marked for future landscaping.  This space will eventually become home to trees, shrubs, perennials, and grasses.  Landscape beds may be flat or bermed with boulders or without, mulched or rocked, edged or edgeless.  It all comes back to your personal preference, your interest in gardening, and your budget.  Landscape beds if done properly will accent the home and tie everything together.  I can go on and on about the design process but for the purposes of this discussion I just want you to understand that the space needs to be created in this step and preferably covered to prevent weeds.  By creating the landscape beds you allow for the next phase, irrigation.  If outdoor lighting is on your radar as a future addition, I’d recommend adding the wiring now as well.  The wire and subsequent labor to install it is fairly inexpensive if you catch it now.  Adding wire to an existing bed covered in mulch or for that matter weed barrier and rock is a real pain in the back side.   It adds needless labor and clean up to the process.  If you’re planning on using rock as your mulch, then weed barrier and edging are also required.  Edging holds the rock from spilling out into the lawn only to be picked up by your mower and thrown through your neighbor’s window.  Simply stated, edging should go in now prior to rocking or mulching if you prefer.  Edging is best installed by a machine, prior to sprinkler head placement.  Remember, the irrigation design is directly affected by the landscape beds.  So finish all of the above up and move to step 6.

6.  Irrigation:  There are many levels of irrigation systems available to the home owner these days.  The essential areas are controllers, heads valves and lines.  Just like a car, you have all sorts of options and upgrades.  Pipe or lines are all fairly standardized these days and I think most of them offer fairly substantial warranties on the pipe.  Ask the irrigation provider what your options are when looking at the irrigation system.  I always suggest upgrading the heads.  Entry level heads won’t last much past five years before they are having problems.  It takes the same amount of time to install an upgraded head so think about this some.  The next area to ponder would be that of upgrading the valves.  Valves control the supply of water to the heads.  Valves can be compared to your heart.  This is another area that I generally make sure I’m utilizing good quality equipment.  Lastly, you have controllers.  I don’t go for all the whistles and bells, I just want one that’s bullet proof.  Landscape beds will most likely require drip irrigation.  This can be done through your irrigation subcontractor or in the case of us; we like to do that portion ourselves.  My plants going in and by god I’m going to ensure that they are protected.  The turf and landscaping have different needs.  Don’t expect an irrigation system without drip to handle your landscape beds effectively.  The number one killer of nursery stock is over watering, that’s why I spend a bit extra and have the two separated and controlled as per their individual needs.  Though drip can be added later in life, it’s much cheaper to do it now as the landscape beds go in!  If you don’t see yourself as being able to hand water during times of drought or stress, than you better get a quote for drip irrigation as well.

7.  Final grade:  This is fairly self-explanatory but I felt it best to talk about it briefly.  As discussed earlier, rough grading is when a contractor whether it is the landscaper or a sub grades your yard and coordinates the water flow away from the home.  They take out the highs and lows so no water is trapped.  Final grading is when the contractor goes in and fixes any tracks left behind from the other contractors (landscape, irrigation, construction). Final grading should alleviate any low spots which hold water. The final grade also breaks up clods and yes for the most part cleans up the debris left by other contractors.  Once the soil is prepared for seed and or sod (step 8) Turf is next.

8.  Turf:  Turf is the final phase for the new home.  Today there are a lot of turf types out there.  Check with your University if applicable and find out what is recommended for your area.  Different turfs have different needs and different uses.  They are also greatly affected by varying levels of sun or shade.  Determine what site is going to have most of (sun or shade) and then do some research on your own or simply ask a qualified landscape contractor.  On larger acreages you may find yourself needing and or wanting multiple turf types.  I find myself recommending native grasses and other less needy varieties for the outlying areas.  Natives look great once established, you can also add wildflower mixes to those areas where a beautiful meadow is desired.  The native grass areas will require little mowing and little irrigation once established.  Once you’ve determined which type of turf to utilize, the next step is to decide on how you want it to be installed.  Nothing beats sod when it comes to holding slopes or making an instant lawn.  At the same time, I tell most of my customers that for the price of switching from sod to seed you can often times come close to paying for your irrigation system.  You are the final say.  Let budget and need determine your course.  If a pet needs access to the yard, than sod may be the way to go.  At the same time, a small fenced in area can be sodded and the rest of the yard seeded.  Slopes can readily be stabilized through the use of sod as well.  Today seeding comes in mainly two forms, hydro seeding or direct seeding.  Hydro seeding utilizes paper pulp to help protect the seed from desiccation and it generally has some type of started fertilizer built into the mix.  Direct seeding can involve broadcast spreading where the seed is tossed out over the area to be seeded or it can be directly installed into the ground via a drill seeder.  If broadcasting is utilized, I’d highly recommend that your installer provide some form or mechanical means to ensure that the seed has a good seed to soil contact.   Keep in mind that some sort of erosion control material will need to be utilized on sloped areas of the yard.  Today’s technology offers a variety of erosion control materials if seeding is your final decision.

Introducing new “Auto Tree Guard’s”!

Introducing our new product, we call it the “Auto Tree Guard”!  The one and only product guaranteed to protect your trees from those nasty string trimmers.  

In all seriousness folks, string trimmers are the number one culprit when it comes to damage to the trunk and subsequent infection by disease or insect pests.  Do the tree a favor and mulch around the base at the very least or in the case of renegade lawn service staff maybe even think about adding a plastic tree guard.  Your tree’s will thank you.

Container Idea 1

Container idea 1:  Color via containers.

Anchor Wall – Retaining wall systems

Landmark Landscapes utilizes many brands of retaining wall system, we lean towards Anchor wall.  Due to the shear number of options out there, here are some web sites:

Anchor Wall:  http://anchorwall.com/exploration/product-catalog/default.aspx

Versa-lok:  https://www.versa-lok.com/products

Kichler (15384) – Directional Flood Light

We often utilize the Kichler (15384) Directional Flood Light as our tool to up light and or spot light unique features in the landscape.  This fixture is in architectural bronze and is made of aluminum for long lasting dependability.  We generally match it to a 20 watt MR-16 lamp for energy efficient lighting.

Kichler (15310) – Dome Path Lighter

The Kichler (15310) is the most utilized path lighter that we offer.  It’s offers a nice look while maintaining a reasonable price.  The fixture is made of aluminum to prevent corrosion and rust.  The light comes with a 16.25 watt lamp that provides about a 15′ circle of illumination.

Red mulch

We offer a red dyed mulch.  It’s sold by the yard.

Brown mulch

We offer a brown dyed mulch, our most popular seller by far.  It’s sold by the yard.

Coffee mulch

We offer an exceptionally dark brown known as Coffee (some call it black) dyed mulch.  It sells by the yard.

Osage Buff Rock

Osage Buff is a nice earth toned rock ranging from 3/4″ on up to 3″ in size.  It has the durability of River Rock with earth tone coloration.  We like to use this in situations where River Rock clashes.  It is sold by the ton.

Limestone Boulders

We carry Limestone boulders ranging from 6″ thick slabs on up to 2′ by 4′ boulders.  They are perfect for natural retaining walls and look nice in combination with earth toned homes.  They are relatively inexpensive but they are not as long lived as granite or moss rock.

Cobble Stone

Cobble stone is merely a larger form of River Rock.  It can be used in the landscape beds and is often utilized in the construction of water ways and water features.  The material itself ranges from just over 3″ on up to 7″.  The cost is higher than that of River rock and the labor to install it is generally higher, as it is harder to handle.

River Rock

River rock ranges in size from 3/4 inch on up to 3″.  We also offer Cobble stone up to 5-7″.  This type of rock is utised in landscape beds and water features.  We sell it by the ton in most cases.

Get a 5 minute tour of Landmark Landscapes at YouTube!

Landmark Landscapes – Lincolns Landscaping Company with many before and after pictures.

 

 

Our first clay bottomed lake project

Howdy fans,

Where do I begin?  Well back in December of 2010 my wife and I purchased the acreage you see to the left.  It encompassed some 3.5 acres which consisted of both semi wooded areas and large expanses of turf.  Campbell’s nursery had done all of the landscaping up to that point and I must say they did a nice job on many of the trees.  I quickly realized the true potential of this property and have made it my goal to turn this acreage into my own garden paradise.  In the spring of 2010, we set about tearing out all the foundation plantings and hardscaping which surrounded the home.  We broadened the beds, introduced a small water feature and installed new larger areas of pavered patio’s and walkways.  We reconfigured the outdoor lighting and added new.  We added a fire pit, a bridge over a dry creek bed and cleared pathways through the wooded areas for the kids.

Yet something was still missing…

Alas, after tactful communication and a great deal of begging, I convinced my wife that a pond, make that a small lake was in order.  I’ve always wanted my own little fishing hole and I just don’t have the patients to fish, so it needs to be close and I need to get results!  We also didn’t care to mow, and we definitely didn’t care to water all that grass.  The planning encompassed installing a 1 acre lake with surrounding wild flower and native grasses in addition to some more naturalistic landscaping.  This lake would allow for us to harvest rain water which we would irrigate the remaining turf with.

Prior to excavation, We hired Hampton Enterprises to move some of the largest trees so as not to kill them.  We rented a large excavator from Murphy equipment to handle the primary excavation work.  I have quite a few years now on excavators and have always felt quite comfortable behind the controls.  Over the course of 3 long days we displaced roughly 3,000 yards of soil to other locations on our acreage.  If we were to buy that amount of soil and have it brought in the bill would be a fortune!!!  Yet, the excess soil was but a by product of the lake.  The large berms which we built with the excess soil allowed for greater privacy and added interest in the landscape.  The lake measures roughly 200′ by 100′ by 20′ deep in places.  I was worried that I might have to line the lake with a rubber liner but at present I feel the lake has a high enough clay content that it will hold water quite nicely.   We created terraces and sunk various natural elements to provide fish habitat.   We laid the lake out so it would catch most of our rain runoff and we connected a portion of our downspouts to the lake to conserve that water as well.  We have since added some 30 or more trees around the lake and have plans for more this spring.  This will be an ongoing learning experience in keeping the lake as clear as possible.  The trees will add shade to help combat algae.  I plan on dying the water as well to help with that cause.  An aeration system will also be added to help keep the lake as healthy as possible.  In some of the best swimming areas, I intend to add sand for a better feel when walking across the bottom.  I would be happy to discuss my thinking and or planning with anyone interested in adding something like this to their acreage.  I will continue to make additions and post them here as our project continues to unfold.  We have some wild ideas for a zip line that you will want to see.  Stay tuned.

 

Mark

Are you doing your part with water conservation?

Rainwater-Harvesting-Systems

Read and know, this is potentially the way of the future. Honestly, with water being such a vital resource, I’m surprised our society hasn’t embraced the concept sooner!  We plan on offering special pricing to those of you whom are willing to do their part and start conserving this vital resource.  Landmark Landscapes being a staunch supporter of water conservation will offer special pricing on these systems to help everyone do their part in an ever changing environment.

 

Continue this story and learn how we can all do more:  Water Conservation System’s

 

 

 

Colorado Red Flagstone

We utilize the pink flagstone on various projects as well.  It ranges from 1.5″-2.5″ in thickness.

Blackhills Flagstone

Blackhills is one of the main earth toned flagstones we utilize.  It ranges from 1.5-2.5″ in thickness and ranges from creams to browns.  It works well for earth toned and redish brick homes.

Rain Chains

Rain chains can be utilized as gutter replacements.  Rain water follows the chains down and may be collected via rain barrels and or diverted to underground storage devices.

Duncan – During construction

Here is our work in progress on the sunken grotto.  Note how we took the bridge from reinforced steel, added 3″ of high tinsel strength concrete, and then ran our pavers right over the top.  We have 4′ reinforced steel and concrete piers on all four corners of the bride as well.  Don’t want it to move!!!  In the end, we will finish out this landscape using many of our customers initial plantings as we saved them when it proved beneficial.  I will take some pictures in a year and show you the project filled out with colorful plantings.

Duncan – The bridge, prior to pavers

Here is the beginning of what will become our pavered bridge.

Tennity – After pictures.

Here are some after installation photos.  Note:  the color both in bloom and foliage.  Contrast is everywhere, and bold distinctions abound through this landscape.  We installed a retaining wall for the elevation changed to accommodate the pool.  As you can see we added a dry creek bed to eliminate trapped water.  Then we installed a flagstone path to the golf course.

Snow Fortress

Next time you have a nice snow and feel energetic, here is a fun project for the family.  Your kids will love it.

Kitchen Idea

Look at this beautiful Kitchen.  It has a French Country kitchen theme, that I must say is amazing!

Kitchen remodel before and after

Here is our first Kitchen remodel by Landmark Landscapes.  Our minimum goal was the addition of granite counter tops.  Along the way a nice concept came into play and additional changes came with pleasing results.  These pictures give you a quick before and after picture.  We offer remodeling and a wide range of construction services at a reduced labor rate during the winter months.  Call us for an estimate prior to the winter months as we do fill up quickly.

 

Note: the center island’s length, cabinet hardware, obviously the counter top, sink and faucet, back splash, and lighting, plus color schemes.

Hobbs – Pergola with swing and screen

Here Landmark Landscapes combined some construction skills with landscaping skills to package a nicely landscaped patio and pergola.  The pergola was built out of Cedar and was beefed up to handle additional weight from the swing.  It’s not visible but we actually have a steel beam built into this pergola so we new it could handle an additional 400 lb’s or so.

Concrete culvert

Here we took on our first culvert project.  I’d say it turned out nicely for our first attempt at forming and pouring a culvert.

Deck built during winter pre-season

Here our customers took advantage of our discounted winter labor rates and had us build them a deck.  This particular deck utilized preasure treated lumber and took a few days.  Landscaping came later.

Bouldered Bank

Here is a nice example of boulders as the building blocks of a landscape.  Glacial Granite boulders are used as the wall element, granted man made products work nicely as well.  With this naturalized setting however we think boulders really makes the project.

Rain Barrels

Rain Barrels are wonderful ways to re-utilize rain water while maintaining a decorative look for the right home.

Mohr – Tree House

Here is another example of a nice play house or tree fort if you prefer.  We even added Low voltage lighting to the interior of this nicely built project.  Nice job Chad.  We later went on to re-landscape, grade out and drain the back yard, removed and added new driveways, moved and added to the fence, plus we added pavered patios to the back and walkways to the front.

Continued upgrades to our first swing set

To think my family started with a swing set.  Maybe I felt I’d missed out on some portion of my childhood?  Maybe my sons thought it a great idea?  No matter how it transpired, this is our upgraded swing set.  It offers a working water faucet in addition to two fully functional water cannons.  The platforms add new meaning to water fights and serve as great defensive positions for my children to pummel me with water as I try to storm the fort.  If you or your children are into play and want to explore some fun construction projects in your back yard just give us a call.

Outdoor living space, where does it start and stop?

I searched the internet to find the perfect definition of an outdoor living space, and to my surprise I came up short, even Wikipedia left me hanging.  In my opinion, creating an inviting outdoor living space is similar to that of changing your house into a home.  They both require an investment of time and materials. They both require the owner to personalize the space.  Some of the adverbs I’d utilize to describe this place would be, comfortable, welcoming, functional, interesting,… etc.  Establishing such takes ability, creativity, experience, and a personal investment in the effort (a.k.a “time and money”).  This definition includes both you and the people doing the work.

Outdoor living can consist of both structural and natural elements.  The tactful combination of these elements determines the overall success of the project.  Structural elements that come to mind include but are not limited to a pergola, deck, outdoor furniture, grill, patio, fire pit, hearth, etc.  Natural elements would be plantings, lighting, contours, fragrance, water, stone, sound, etc.  The outdoor living space is not to be confused with an outdoor kitchen.  An outdoor kitchen is simply structural elements in combination with the needed appliances to cook outdoors.   Therefore the outdoor living space may include an outdoor kitchen but is not limited to having one.  A growing trend in residential landscaping is that of placing more emphasis into the outdoor living space.  This is perhaps one of the most cost effective home improvements.

Improving your home is always a good investment. In the current economic environment, people are staying home.  Adding to your home’s value is smart, it positions you well if ever decide to sell your home as it makes your home more marketable.  At the same time, it improves your way of life and adds to your overall health and well being by placing you in direct contact with the outdoors.

Glacial Granite

Glacial Granite Boulders are our standard building blocks in the landscape.  They are colorful, permanent features of the landscape that add character and dimension.

Colorado Moss Rock

Colorado Moss Rock boulders.  A sandstone that is covered in Lichen (a.k.a moss) allowing for a very natural rustic appearance.  Note: They are very attractive in the landscape and ponds but tend to break up over time in water features.

Duncan – Pavered Bridge Completed

Here is our first steel and concrete bridge finished in pavers.  Built from scratch, looks wonderful when under lighted at night.  I will provide additional photos when the plants fill out in a year.

Hidden Flagstone Patio

Wooded lots offer unique opportunities in the landscape arena.  This lot allowed for a secluded patio of flagstone.  Throw in some subtle landscape lighting and you’ve created a warm, quite, intimate space.

Arborvitae, Hetz Midget

2′ high by 2′ wide. Dense, compact, globe arborvitae that tolerates full sun.

Yew, Wardi

3′ high by 5′ wide. Smaller yew with dark green foliage that tolerates shade.

Yew, Tauntoni

3′ high by 5′ wide. Smaller globed shaped yew that can handle sun to shade.

Yew, Hicks

12′ high by 6′ wide. Upright and columnar yew with dark green foliage and can handle sun to shade.

Yew, Everlow

2′ high by 4′ wide. Low spreading yew that handles part shade.

Yew, Dense

4′ high by 6′ wide. Dark green foliage yew that handles part shade areas.

Yew, Dark Green

4′ high by 6′ wide. Dark green foliage yew with a high tolerance to shade, can also be planted in partial shade.

Yew, Chadwick

3′ high by 4′ wide. Dwarf yew with dark green foliage. It is a shade evergreen.

Pine, Blue Shag

4′ high by 4′ wide. This is a dwarf, globe white pine with soft blue foliage.

Pine, Slowmound Mugo

2′ high by 2′ wide. Much tighter and slower growing than dwarf mugo pine.

Pine, Dwarf Mugo

4′ high by 4′ wide. A dense mounding pine with compact growth form.

Spruce, Globe Blue – On Standard

3-4′ high and 3-4′ wide. Tight mounding spruce with blue tint in the needles. This dwarf blue spruce is grafted on a standard.

Spruce, Globe Blue – Low

3-4′ high and 3-4′ wide. Tight mounding spruce with blue tint in the needles.

Spruce, Bird’s Nest

3′ high by 3′ wide. Dark green evergreen shrub that resembles a birds nest.

Juniper, Sea Green

4-6′ high by 5-6′ wide. Medium sized evergreen with green foliage. Drought tolerant, good hedge or accent shrub.

Juniper, Saybrook Gold

4′ high by 6′ wide. Medium sized evergreen shrub with yellow foliage.

Juniper, Old Gold

2′ high by 4′ wide. Compact juniper with golden foliage and is a slow grower.

Juniper, Calgary Carpet

.5-1′ high by 8′ wide. Low spreading juniper with green foliage.

Juniper, Broadmoor

2′ high by 8′ wide. A dense mounding, low spreading evergreen with bluish-green foliage.

Landscaped creek

A beautiful creek naturalized through landscaping.

Juniper, Blue Star

2′ high by 3′ wide. Low mounding juniper with bluish spiny foliage. Avoid wet areas.

Juniper, Blue Rug

.5′ high by 6′ wide. Almost flat growing ground cover juniper. Bluish foliage that gets a purlish tint in the winter

Cypress, Mops

3′ high by 3′ wide.  Has gold thread-like foliage, low mounding.

Boxwood, Green Velvet

3′ high by 3′ wide. a boxwood with good shape and vigorous growth.

Boxwood, Green Mountain

5′ high by 3′ wide. Upright evergreen shrub, with good winter color.

Maple, Burgundy Belle

45′ high by 35′ wide, hardy Maple with a beautiful burgundy fall color.

Castle Wall Hearth and Railing

Here is an example of Castle Wall Block application in the landscape.  In this photo, we utilized Castle Wall Block to build both a hearth and railing that can be used as a sitting wall.

What components comprise a professional landscape?

As a landscape professional, I ask a fairly complex question of my customers; “what look do you have in mind for your landscape”? On many occasions I get, “I’d like my yard to look great” or “I want some nice curb appeal”. These generalized statements are exactly what designers constantly address. The fact is many customers lack an understanding of what a professional landscape can entail. I will cover some of the basics in the design concept below.

Per Wikipedia – Landscaping refers to any activity that modifies the visible features of an area of land, including:

1. Living elements, such as flora or fauna; or what is commonly referred to as gardening, the art and craft of growing plants with a goal of creating a beautiful environment within the landscape.
2. Natural elements such as landforms, terrain shape and elevation, or bodies of water;
3. Human elements such as structures, buildings, fences or other material objects created and/or installed by humans; and
4. Abstract elements such as the weather and lighting conditions.
Landscaping is both science and art, and requires good observation and design skills. A good landscaper understands the elements of nature and construction, and blends them accordingly.

The above definition speaks of elements both natural and human. A landscape professional will have an eye for combining these elements in a creative, harmonious, and sustainable manner. In a perfect world, I have a few elements available right out of the shoot. The first natural element I prefer to have or add is elevation. In the picture below, one can clearly see how the ground slopes. This is a good example of elevation change. Elevation change allows one to stack items, if done properly; nothing is hidden behind taller items. Depth is visibly created in the bed through the use of contrasting elements. The picture below does a nice job of featuring contrast as well. We see contrast in color from plant to plant and through the introduction of boulders. I also see the use of contrasting texture as some plantings offer long grassy leaves where others have small dainty leaves. I see too many landscapes where there is very little contrast between one plant and the next. This slope planted with only plants providing green foliage would have presented an entirely different look. Again and again, I see my eye drawn to landscapes that combine elevation change, stone elements, contrasting foliage color, contrasting foliage texture, and differing heights. If you can maintain these principles your landscape is off to the right start in my opinion.

Pine Wilt… Do your trees have it and what to do!

It sickens me to see all the destruction with Pine Wilt these days. Face it, unfortunately it’s here to stay. Here is an article published by the USDA http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/howtos/ht_pinewilt/pinewilt.htm
I hope you find it helpful. If you need additional help such as removal of dead or dying Pines give us a call.

Natural Limstone steps through a bouldered wall.

An example of natural limstone steps incorperated into a bouldered wall.

A beautiful job has all the right components.

Here is a professionally done landscape.  Take notice of all the colors, textures, contrasting sizes and shapes.  An interesting landscape is comprised of many elements, coordinated into one attractive theme.

Please click on our inspirations tab for ideas!!!

The inspirations tab will give you ideas and a feel for what we can accomplish in your yard. The plant data tab should show you pictures of most of the plant material we offer, with specifications for each plant. The materials data tab should guide you through our lengthy list of materials. Send me your feedback please.

Zysset – Water feature

Here we added a bubbling stream right next to the steps.  Boulders and water are ever present through out this landscape.

Zysset – Project after pictures

This project is filling in nicely wouldn’t you say.   This was a major renovation, with essentially most of the back yard being torn out.  We worked around the large trees, contracted concrete experts to weave the sidewalk and steps through the landscape down the slope.  The deck was added using composit materials for durability.  A sound system was built into the landscape as construction ensued, lighting was also built into the project.  This picture just doesn’t do the project justice, you just have to be there and interact with the space to have a feel for how much is going on!

Tree fort – My first water cannon

Built this in my basement out of PVC pipe and assorted fittings. We plumbed water right up the tree and now the kids can spray each other or the dog from over 35′. The kids and I love it!

What not to do?

Here is a good example of  “In my opinion” what not to do in your landscape.  As a landscaper, I crying when I see yards like this.  If nothing else it goes to show just how important professional landscaping is in the overall valuation of your property.  This random placement of stones, and bleak expanse of river rock, only lessons the value of this home.

Lee – An after picture

In this case, our customer had purchased a home and was left with some challenging problems.  The prior home owner had built a wall that didn’t fit into the new home owners game plan.  We were commisioned to take out the old and bring in the new.  The wall was failing in spots and re-building it with out having a source for additional stone to match, was not an option.  This renovation involved adding natural Limestone snap steps, pavered walkways, a patio, a pondless water feature and landscaping.  The customer wanted rock instead of mulch to lessen maintenance.  I’m still a mulch fan, especially when boulders are being utilized.  The mulch adds contrast to the boulders and really allows them to stand out.  For customers that are after reduced maintenance, this maybe the way to go.  In time, proper placement of plantings will allow for nice contrast as they mature and fill in the river rocked areas.

Walsh – One year later

Our first picture was taken in November 0f 09′, this one is one year later to the date.

Fritz – A tree and bouldered lined circle drive.

Here our customer wanted to remedy some problem mowing while still maintaining a natural look.  Our remedy was to build in boulders and add a complementary selection of trees for color and interest.  Now they just allow the buffalo grass to grow and enjoy.  Yes, I will approach them about lighting someday!

Petersan “Corner planting Spring”

Tree fort fun

Here is what we men build when something was missing from our childhood. At the same time, we love building things at Landmark, and building for kids is even better! This particular fort comes with two working water cannons and running water on multiple levels. Trap doors and swinging cranes with pulley systems add the children’s fun.

Acreage clearing

In the winter months, we like to work on projects that still entail the outdoors when ever possible. On many occasions, we offer great winter labor rates for this  type of work. Winter duties can entail large scale soil moving such as lake construction, underbrush removal in wooded locations, we have carved out walking paths through the woods, and we are always available to take down the unfortunate Nematode strickened pines. Give us a call if your interested in some winter work at a great price!

Acreage Trees!!!

Acreage owners should be aware that we offer some of the best deals in town on high quality, locally grown trees. We offer various sizes that range from smaller caliper trees on up to 4″ caliper 16′ +specimen grade trees. Don’t worry about damage from large tree spades and the stresses that are associated with spaded trees. We can generally move in even large caliper trees with minimal damage to existing turf.

We also offer special pricing on pre-season ordering of native plant material for naturalizing effects associated with acreages.

Tennity – A beginning… there was turf?

Here is what we started with in July. A basic back yard with a large expanse of turf and limited landscaping. The Tennity’s had quite the check list of needs. Our plan covered most of them, and we added a few additions along the way to bring the entire project together. To date this has been my toughest back yard renovation and most rewarding. I’ve learned a great deal from this project. Namely, with the right equipment, planning, and motivation, anything is possible.

Rose – Project before and afters

Well what do you think.  We gutted the pond and built an entirely new one.   Tree’s were added for shade and dimension.  Plantings were changed to better fit the design and mood we were shooting for.  Boulders and contours were added as a backbone to this landscape.  Finally, lighting was introduced, which tied the whole project together and extended the use of this special area.

Williams – Project before and afters

Privacy was gained through the installation of large trees, some topping out at 4″ caliper. We also utilized grade change through berming and boulder work to elevate our plantings. Elevation change also aided us in providing our customer with a nice water feature. Hardscaping in the form of pavers and castle wall added additional usable space to the back yard. A natural gas fire pit was installed to take the chill out of those cold Nebraska nights. Lastly, we installed lighting on both the landscaping, hardscaping, and the house itself. Here we did our best to better life for this uprooted Mizzu fan. May your ship sail strong on this ever present sea of red.

Salvia, Sensation Rose

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Pink flowers in May to August. Plant in full sun to part sun.

Vinca, Minor

Less than .5′ high by fast spreading wide.  Ground cover with small purple flowers and can handle full sun to full shade.

Veronica, Waterperry Blue

Less than .5′ high by 1′ wide. Low growing Veronica with light blue flower in summer to early fall. Plant in full sun to part sun.

Veronica, Sunshine

.5′ high by .5-1′ wide. Low growing ground cover that has yellow foliage. Plant in full sun to part shade.

Veronica, Royal Candles

1-1.5′ high by 1-2′ wide. Royal blue flowers from July to August. Plant in full sun to part sun.

Veronica, Red Fox

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. Rose-red blooms in summer to early fall. Plant in full sun to part shade.

Veronica, Icicle White

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. White flowers from June to September. Plant in full sun.

Veronica, Goodness Grows

1′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Blue flowers in summer to fall. Plant in full sun to part sun.

Veronica, Giles Van Hees

.5-1′ high by 1′ wide. Pink flowers in early spring to late fall. Plant in full sun to part sun.

Tricyrtis, Toad Lily

1.5-2′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Pink blooms in the fall. Plant in full to part shade.

Tradescantia, Sweet Kate

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. Blue-purple flowers in summer. Plant in full to part shade. Grass like foliage.

Tradescantis, Satin Doll

1-1.5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide. Pink flowers in summer. Grass like foliage. Plant in full to part shade.

Tradescantia, Red Grape

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Pink three petal bloom that blooms in summer. Plant in part to full shade. Has grass like foliage.

Tiarella (Foamflower), Wherryi

Less than 1′ high by 1′ wide. White flowers in spring. Plant in full to part shade.

Tiarella (Foamflower), Pirate’s Patch

1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Creamy white flowers in spring. Plant in full to part shade.

Tiarella (Foamflower), Candy Striper

1′ high by 1′ wide. Part shade to shade. Flower is shades of white and bloom in spring time.

Thymus, Creeping Thyme

Less than 1′ high by 1-2′ wide. Lavender-pink flowers in summer. Plant in full sun to part shade.

Stokesia (Stoke’s Aster), Purple Pixie

.75′ high by less than 1′ wide. Plant in full sun to part shade. Smaller purple flowers in summer.

Stokesia (Stoke’s Aster), Honeysong Purple

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Purple flowers in summer, plant in full sun to part sun.

Stokesia (Stoke’s Aster), Blue Danube

1′ high by 1.5′ wide. Blue-silver flowers in summer, plant in full sun to part sun.

Stachys (Lamb’s Ear), Hummelo

1-1.5′ high by 1′ wide. Lot different than Helene Von Stein Lamb’s Ear, cluster of dark green leaves. Rose color flowers in summer. Plant in full sun.

Stachys (Lamb’s Ear), Helene Von Stein

1′ high by 2′ wide. Silvery-green leaves. Prefers dry areas. Plant in full sun to part sun.

Solidago (Goldenrod), Little Lemon

1′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Bright yellow flowers in late summer lasting to fall. Plant in full sun.

Solidago (Goldenrod), Golden Baby

1.5-2′ high by 1′ wide.  Yellow flowers in late summer. Plant in full sun.

Solidago (Goldenrod), Fireworks

2-2.5′ high by 2-2.5′ wide. A dome of golden flowers that look like fieworks exploding in the fall. Plant in full sun.

Sedum, Vera Jameson

1′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Mahogany-red foliage with rose color flowers in late summer.  Plant in full sun.

Sedum, Tricolor Dragon’s Blood

Less than .5′ high by 1′ wide.  Red, green, and white foliage color.  Small pink flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Sedum, Tetractinum

Less than .5′ high.  This ground cover has green foliage that turns a bronze color in the fall. Yellow flowers in clusters.

Sedum, Sieboldii Mediovariegatum

1′ high.  Blue-green and cream variegated leaves.  Pink color flowers in the fall.  Plant in full sun.

Sedum, Neon

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Bright pink flowers in late summer.  Good plant as a mass planting.  Plant in full sun.

Sedum, Purple Form

Less than .5′ high.  Foliage comes out blue-green in spring, changes to a blue-gray in summer, changing to a purple in fall. Plant in full sun.

Sedum, Purple Emperor

1-1.5′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Dark purple foliage with red flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Sedum, Postman’s Pride

1-2′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Purple foliage with rose pink flowers in late summer to fall.  Full sun and needs very little water once established.

Sedum, Kamtschaticum Variegatum

Less than .5′ tall.  Leaves are variegated with creamy margins and in summer star-shaped yellow flowers open from pink buds.

Sedum, Kamtschaticum

Less than .5′ high by 1′ wide.  Ground cover that has green foliage throughtout the year. Yellow flowers in late summer through out the fall.  Plant in full sun.

Sedum, Frosty Morn

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. Variegated white and green foliage.  The flower color is either white or light pink depending on the heat of the area.  Plant in full sun.

Sedum, Dragon’s Blood

Less than .5′ high by 2-3′ wide.   Ground cover that has reddish foliage all year long. Plant in full sun.  Pink to red flowers in late summer.

Sedum, Blue Spruce

Less than .5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  This ground cover has bluish-green foliage all year long.  Yellow flowers in summer. Plant in full sun.

Sedum, Autumn Joy

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Pink flowers in late summer that turn a deep red into fall.  Plant in full sun and can handle drought tolerant areas.

Sedum, Autumn Fire

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Rosy-pink flowers in later summer that turn a coppery red in fall.  Flower last long than Autumn Joy Sedum.  Plant in full sun and can handle drought tolerant areas.

Sedum, Angelina

Less than .5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Ground cover that has golden foliage that turns a coppery/green color in the fall.  Yellow flowers in the spring.

Scabiosa, Pink Mist

1-1.5′ high by 1′ wide.  Pink flowers all summer long.  Plant in full sun.

Scabiosa, Butterfly Blue

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Lavender-blue flowers all summer long.  Plant in full sun.

Salvia, Snow Hill

1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide. White flowers in summer. Plant in full sun.

Salvia, Sensation Rose

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Lilac-pink flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Salvia, May Night

1.5-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Deep purple flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Salvia, Marcus

.5-1′ high by .5-1′ wide.  Deep purple flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Salvia, Caradonna

2-2.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Dark purple flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Salvia, Blue Hill

1.5-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Purplish-blue flowers in summer.  Full sun to partial sun.

Sagina, Scottish Gold Moss

Less than .5′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Ground cover that does well between rocks, pathways and other traffic areas.  Little white flowers in spring.  Scottish Gold has more of a yellowish green tint to the foliage.

Sagina, Irish Green Moss

Less than .5′ high by 1-2′ wide. This ground cover looks like a green moss and can be used between rocks, paths and high traffic areas. Little white flowers in spring.

Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susan), Prairie Sun

2.5-3′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Bi-color flowers with yellow turning into orange with a green center.   Blooms in summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susan), Little Suzy

1-1.5′ high by 1′ wide.  Yellow flowers with brown centers and blooms in summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susan), Indian Summer

3-4′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Yellow flowers with a dark center.  Blooms in summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susan), Goldstrum

2-2.5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Gold flowers with and brown center and bloom in the summer time.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Pulmonaria (Lungwort), Raspberry Splash

1′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Raspberry-pink flowers in spring.  Plant in full shade to part shade.

Pulmonaria (Lungwort), Mrs. Moon

.5-1′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Blue/purple flowers in spring.  Plant in full shade to part shade.

Polemonium, (Jacob’s Ladder), Stairway To Heaven

1-1.5′ high by 1′ wide.  Blue flowers in late spring.  Plant in full shade to afternoon shade.  Variegated white and green leaves.

Polemonium (Jacob’s Ladder), Brise d’ Anjou

1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Variegated white and green leaves.  Blue-violet flowers in summer.  Plant full shade to afternoon shade.

Platycodon (Balloon Flower), Sentimental Blue

.5′ high by 1′ wide.  Flowers are blue, they come out looking like little balloons which then open up into a flower.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Phlox, White Creeping

Less than .5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. Ground cover plant has white flowers in spring. Plant in full sun.

Phlox, Emerald Pink

Less than .5′ high by 3′ wide.  Ground cover plant that has emerald pink flowers in spring time.  Plant in full sun.  Likes moist but well drain soils.

Phlox, Emerald Blue

Less than .5′ tall by 3′ wide.  This Ground cover plant has emerald blue flowers in spring.  Plant in full sun.

Phlox, White Flame

1-1.5′ high by 1′ wide.  White flowers in the summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Phlox, Red Riding Hood

1.5-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Red flowers in the summer.  Plant in full sun.

Phlox, Purple Flame

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Purple flowers in the summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Phlox, Pink Flame

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Pink flowers in the summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Phlox, Junior Dream

1.5-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Purple flowers in the summer.  Plant in full sun.

Phlox, Junior Bouquet

1.5-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Pink flowers blooming all summer long.  Plant in full sun.

Phlox, Flamingo

2′ high by 2′ wide.  Pink flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Phlox, David

2-3′ high by 2′ wide.  White flowers in late July through August.  Plant in full sun.

Perovskia, Little Spires

2-2.5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Dwarf variety of Russian Sage.  Purple flowers in the summer.  Green/grey foliage.  Plant in full sun.

Perovskia, Russian Sage

3-3.5′ high by 3-3.5′ wide.  Purple flowers in the summer.  Green/grey foliage.  Plant in full sun.

Penstemon, Red Rocks

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Pinkish-red flowers in the summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Penstemon, Prairie Dusk

1-2′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Purple flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Penstemon, Pikes Peak

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Purple flowers that bloom in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Penstemon, Husker Red

3-3.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  White flowers in middle of summer.  Purplish to green foliage through out the year.

Penstemon, Elfin Pink

1.5-2′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Coral pink flowers in early to late summer.  Full sun to part sun.

Pardacanda, Candy Lily

2-3′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Partial sun to partial shade.  Flowers are a variety of colors with pink, yellow, orange and red in them.

Paeonia, White Peony

2-2.5′ high by 1.5-2.5′ wide.  White flowers in May-June.  Plant in full sun.

Paeonia, Red Peony

2-2.5′ high by 1.5-2.5′ wide.  Red flowers in May-June.  Plant in full sun.

Pachysandra, Japanese Spurge

.5′ high by 2′ wide.  Sun to part shade.  White bloom and is a ground cover.

Oenothera, Missouri Primrose

.5-1′ high by 1-3′ wide.  Yellow flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.  Prefers dry areas.

Nepeta, Walker’s Low

1.5′ high by 2′ wide.  Blue flowers in summer.  Green/grey foliage.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Nepeta, Little Titch

.5′ high by 1′ wide.  Smaller than Walker’s Low.  Blue flowers in summer.  Green/grey foliage.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Nepeta, Blue Wonder

1′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Blue flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.  Green/grey foliage.

Monarda (Bee Balm), Petite Wonder

1′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Pink flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Monarda (Bee Balm), Petite Delight

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Dwarf Bee Balm with pink flowers.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Monarda (Bee Balm), Jacob Cline

3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Red flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Monarda (Bee Balm), Fireball

1.5-2′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Red flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Lysimachia, Green Moneywort

Less that .5′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Green foliage with yellow flowers in summer.  Plant in part sun to shade.

Lysimachia, Gold Moneywort

Less than .5′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Ground cover that has a golden foliage. Plant in part sun to shade.  Yellow flowers in the fall.

Liriope (Lily Turf), Silver Dragon

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Green and silver variegated leaves.  Plant in full sun to part shade.

Liriope (Lily Turf), Big Blue

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Green grass like leaves with blue flowers in midsummer.  Plant in full sun to part shade.

Ligularia, Othello

3-4′ high by 1-3′ wide.  Gold flowers in late summer.  Plant in sun to partial sun.

Ligularia, Little Rocket

2-2.5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Yellow flowers in summer.  Plant in partial sun.

Liatrtis (Gay Feather), Kobold

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Purple flowers in summer.  Full sun and can tolerate warm dry areas.

Liatris (Gay Feather), Floristan

3-4′ high by 1-2′ wide.  White flowers in summer.  Full sun and likes heat and drought areas.

Lewisia, Rainbow Mix

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Flowers a mix of colors from yellow, orange, pink, and peach.  Plant in full sun and well drain soils.

Leucanthemum (Daisy), Snow Cap

1-1.5′ high by 1′ wide.  White flowers in the summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Leucanthemum (Daisy), Fiona Coghill

2-2.5′ high by 1-2′ wide.  White double flowers in June- July.  Full sun to part shade.

Leucanthemum (Daisy), Becky

2-3′ high by 1-2′ wide.  White flowers in spring and summer.  Full sun to part sun.

Leucanthemum (Daisy), Alaska

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  White flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Lavender, Hidcote

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Deep purple flowers in summer.  Blue-green foliage.  Plant in full sun.

Lavender, Cynthia Johnson

1.5-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Dark blue-purple flowers.  Blooms in summer and plant in full sun.

Maple, Shantung

20-25′ high by 20′ wide. Green foliage in summer that turns a yellow to orange color.

Maple, Royal Red Norway

40′ high by 40′ wide. Reddish-maroon foliage. Slower growing tree.

Maple, Autumn Spire

40′ high by 25′ wide.  Good street tree. Seedless tree with red foliage in the fall.

Maple, Autumn Fantasy

50′ high by 40′ wide.  Fast growing mix of the Red and Silver Maples.  Red fall color.

Maple, Red Select Dissectum

4-6′ high by 5-7′ wide.  Plant in full sun to part sun. Great accent plant. Red leaves though out the summer.

Maple, Crimson Queen Dissectum

6′ high by 8′ wide.  Plant in full sun to part shade. Likes afternoon shade. Use as an accent plant.  Red leaves though out the year.

Lamium, Red Nancy

.5′ high by 2′ wide.  White leaves with dark green margins.  Pink flowers.  Plant in part shade.

Lamium, White Nancy

.5′ high by 2′ wide.  White leaves with dark green margins.  White flowers.  Plant in part shade.

Lamiun, Anne Greenway

.5′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Gold and green variegation.  Light purple flowers.  Plant in part shade.

Iris, Variegated

2.5′ high  by 2′ wide. Variegated foliage with purple flowers.  Plant in full sun.

Iris, Variegated Japanese

3′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Blades are half green and half creamy white.  Purple flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun to part sun.

Iris, Ruffled Velvet

2.5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Green foliage with purple flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Iris, Caesar’s Brothers

2.5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Green foliage with purple flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Iris, Aureo-Variegata

2.5′ high by 2-2.5′ wide.  Yellow and green variegation.  Purple flowers in early summer.  Plant in sun.

Hosta, Wide Brim

2.5′ high by 2.5′ wide.  Green foliage with light green margins on the outside of the leaf.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Whirlwind

1.25′ high by 3′ wide.  Light green foliage with dark green margins on the outside of the leaf.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Sun Power

2.5′ high by 4′ wide.  Golden-yellow foliage.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in sun to shade.

Hosta, Sum And Substance

4′ high by 5′ wide.  Light green foliage. Light lavender flowers.  Plant in sun to shade.

Hosta, Royal Standard

2.5′ high by 3.5′ high.  Green foliage.  White flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Queen Josephine

1′ high by 2.5′ wide.  Green foliage with yellow margins on the outside of the leaf.  Lavender flowers. Plant in shade.

Hosta, Patriot

2′ high by 3.5′ wide.  Dark green foliage with white margins on the outside of the leaf.  Lavender flower.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Krossa Regal

3.5′ high by 3′ wide.  Green-blue foliage.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, June

1.25′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Light green foliage with grey-blue margins on the outside of the leaf.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Halcyon

1.5′ high by 2′ wide.  Blue-green foliage.  Lilac-blue flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Great Expectations

2′ high by 2.5′ wide.  Light green foliage with dark green margins on the outside of the leaf.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Golden Tiara

1′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Green foliage with light green margins on the outside of the leaf.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Gold Standard

2.5′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Light green foliage.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Gaucomole

2′ high by 2.5′ wide.  Light green foliage with dark green margins on the outside of the leaf.  Can handle sunnier locations. White to light lavender flowers.

Hosta, Frances Williams

2′ high by 4′ wide.  Green foliage with light green margins on the outside of the leaf.  White flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Francee

2′ high by 2.5′ wide.  Green foliage with with white margins on the outside of the leaf.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Fragrant Bouquet

1.5′ high by 3′ wide.  Green foliage with irregular white to light green margins on the outside of the leaf.  Fragrant white flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Fire And Ice

1.5′ high by 1′ wide.  White foliage with green margins on the outside of the leaf.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Elegans

2.5′ high by 3′ wide.  Green-blue foliage with white flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Christmas Tree

1.5′ high by 2.5′ wide.  Dark green foliage with creamy white margins on the outside of the leaf.  Lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Blue Mouse Ears

.5′ high by 1′ wide.  Blue-green foliage with lavender flowers.  Smaller hosta plant in shade.

Hosta, Blue Angel

3′ high by 4′ wide.  Blue-green foliage with white flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Big Daddy

2.5′ high by 4′ wide.  Blue-green foliage with white flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Aureo-Marginata

1.5′ high by 2′ wide.  Green leaves with light green margins on the outside of the leaf.  Plant in shade.  Lavender flowers.

Hosta, August Moon

1.5′ high by 2.5′ wide.  Light green foliage with white to lavender flowers.  Plant in shade.

Hosta, Albo-Marginata

1.5′ high by 2′ wide.  Green foliage with while margins on the outside of the leaves.  Plant in shade.  Lavender flowers.

Granite bouldered wall/berm

Here granite boulders are used in the landscape as retainage along the neighbors property line.

Limestone boulder wall

A nicely done wall using limestone boulders.

Pergola as part of an outdoor room

Today the trend is to bring the living space outside.  Here a pergola was used in conjunction with outdoor furniture and other amendities.  As one can see, a classy yet comfortable look and feel is well within reach.

An outdoor courtyard

Here you have a charming outdoor courtyard effect.  Segmented block, pavers, color and contour, comprise the finished product.

Fire pit using Granite boulders built into sitting wall

Here we built the fire pit right into the sitting wall.  You could say we killed two birds with one stone… well a few actually.

Wooded trail

Not everyone has the space to create a beautifull trail like this one but for those who do… wow what a soothing walk this could be.

Seasonal Lighting 5

LED Ornament Rod Linkables with multi colored garland and starburst add color and action to this Christmas theme.

Seasonal Lighting 4

LED Holly w/ Berry Linkables is used to provide festive color.

Seasonal Lighting 3

LED Icicle Linkables, wreaths, garland and toy soldiers.  Here is a festive look while still maintaining the benifits of energy conservation.

Hibiscus, Pink Swirl

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Compact plant with pink flowers that fade to white.  Blooms in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Hibiscus, Luna Red

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Red flowers in summer.  Compact plant that needs full sun to light shade.

Hibiscus, Kopper King

3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Burgundy foliage with light pink flowers.  Full sun to light shade.

Hibiscus, Fireball

3-4′ high by 3′ wide.  Red flowers in July-August.  Plant in full sun.

Hibiscus, Blue River II

4-5′ high by 3′ wide.  Big white flowers that blooms June through September.  Plant in full sun.

Heucherella (Foamy Bells), Bridget Bloom

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Full sun to light shade.  Pink and white flowers with green foliage.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Tiramisu

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Red foliage with green edges.  Part shade to shade.  Small white flowers in early summer.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Snow Angel

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Green foliage with small red flowers in June.  Full sun to part shade.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Regina

1-2′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Burgundy-bronze leaves with small pink flowers in June-July.  Plant in part shade.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Plum Pudding

1-2′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Dark purple foliage with pink small flowers in June.  Shade to part shade.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Peach Melba

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Reddish orange foliage.  Pink flower in June.  Plant in part shade to shade.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Palace Purple

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Purple foliage with small white flowers in June.  Full sun to part shade.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Obsidian

1-2′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Dark, shinny black leaves, with small white flowers in summer.  Part shade to shade.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Georgia Peach

1-2′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Peachy-orange foliage with small white flowers.  Full shade to part shade.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Dolce Mocha Mint

1-1.5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Silvery-green foliage with small pink flowers in June.  Full sun to part shade.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Dolce Creme Brule

1′ high by 1′ wide.  Bronze foliage with a small light pink flower in June-July.  Full sun to part shade.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Chocolate Ruffles

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Purple leaves with small white flowers in June-July.  Full sun to full shade.  Plant does well in part shade, and it has best leaf color.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Caramel

.5-1′ high by 1′ wide.  Caramel leaves.  Small white flowers in summer.  Full sun to full shade.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Blackout

.5-1′ high by 1′ wide.  Small plant with very dark purple leaves.  Full sun to part shade.  Small cream flowers that bloom in June-July.

Heuchera (Coral Bell), Amethyst Mist

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Dark purple leaves with silvery veins.  Full sun to part shade.  Can handle full shade if moisture is right.  Small flowers in June-July.

Beautiful way to handle drainage.

Look at how artistically the drainage is handled in this project.  Stone elements, decorative rock and softscaping in the form of plant material.  Stunning!

Concrete vs Pavers

We admit the tendency is towards paver’s but concrete works nicely as well.  Here is a before shot of pool project prior to concrete.

Seasonal Lighting 2

Incandescent Snow Flake Linkables, lit wreaths, garland and c-7 lighting along the roof peak provide a warm winter theme.

Seasonal Lighting 1

Incandescent Icicle Linkables, lit wreaths and garland provide a pleasing traditional look.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), Strawberry Candy

2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Light pink on the outside and dark pink on the inside of the flower.  Full sun to part sun.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), Stella de Oro

2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Golden flowers in summer that re-bloom.  Full sun to part sun.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), Siloam Dream Baby

1.5′ high by 2′ wide.  Light apricot flower with a red ring in the middle.  Full sun.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), Ruby Red Stella

1.5′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Ruby-red flowers that bloom summer to frost.  Full sun.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), Rosy Returns

1-1.5′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Pink-red flowers that re-blooms. Full sun to part sun.

Heremocallis (Daylily), Pardon Me

1-1.5′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Reddish flower with a yellow/green throat in summer. Full sun to part sun.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), Mini Pearl

1.5′ high by 2-2.5′ wide.  Peach flower that is a re-bloomer.  Full sun.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), Mary Todd

2-2.5′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Large yellow flowers in summer.  Full fun to part sun.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), Little Grapette

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Light purple flower in summer.  Full sun to part sun.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), Happy Returns

1.5-2′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Yellow flowers in summer.  Full sun to part sun.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), Fairy Tale Pink

2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide. Pale pink flower in summer. Full sun to part sun.

Hemerocallis (Daylily), El Desperado

2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide. Yellow flowers with a reddish line in the middle. Full sun to part sun.

Helleborus, Brandywine

1-1.5′ high by 1′ wide.  Mixed color flowers in early spring. Prefers morning sun and afternoon shade.

Geranium (Cranesbill), Vision Violet

.5-1′ high by .5-1′ wide.  Violet flowers in late spring to early summer.  Full sun to part sun.

Geranium (Cranesbill), Sanguinium

1′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Pink flowers in summer.  Part sun to sun.

Geranium (Cranesbill), Rozanne

1.5′ high by 4-5′ wide.  Blue flowers in summer.  Sun to part sun.

Geranium (Cranesbill), Max Frei

.5′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Dwarf geranium with pink flowers in late spring to summer.  Sun to part sun.

Geranium (Cranesbill), Johnson’s Blue

2′ high by 2′ wide.  Blue flowers in late spring to summer.  Sun to part sun.

A reminder that plants GROW.

Every now and then I come across the craziest of pictures. Here we have the perfect example of people not considering how large an item is potentially going to grow. I see this all the time, maybe not this extreme but none the less many designers and or “do it yourselfers” don’t have a clue or just don’t care. Please get some facts on the plants you intend to install. Today the Internet offers fantastic information on plant material. We try to list the specifications on those plants we like to utilize in our web site. If you go with a landscaping professional, do some checking and take a look at there credentials. Knowledge and experience go a long ways in making your landscape project a success.

Geranium (Cranesbill), Biokovo

1′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Light pink flowers in late spring to mid summer.  Sun to part sun.

Geranium (Cranesbill), Alpenglow

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Full sun to part sun.  Lavender-pink flowers in late spring to mid summer.

Steps – Manufactured stone

Concrete “stone look a like” block has come along way these days.  Customers have many choices these days.  Applications very as well.  Here steps are created using manufactured stone blocks and pavers.

Poolside – Projects

As I said before, pools make our job easier.  Look at the color and interest, couple that with the reflection off the water and you have a recipe for success.

Lighted home 1

Nicely done home.  Corners and sides of windows are uplighted.

Water Feature Lighted

All water features look better under lights.  Here the feature continues to add enjoyment into the evening hours.

Trees – lighted

The form and branching structure of trees can be lighted nicely all year round.

Lighted steps 2

Great hardscaping deserves lighting!  Here a charming pathway and steps are utilized into the evening with the use of proper path lighting.

Lighted steps 1

In these steps, we used special low voltage lights that with some work can be made to fit right into the block itself.

Large scale residential lighting

Here lighting is tastefully used to highlight key architectural elements of the home.

Walsh – Bring the camp fire to you!

Here we added a nice area right off the house that allows for a nice fire.  You can cook out or just enjoy a nice evening by the fire with this cozy hardscape.

Window wells

Window wells don’t have to be bland and boring.  Using the right block can add form and function to those troubled spaces.

Landscaped creek

A naturalised creek with landscaping.

Gaura, Whirling Butterflies

2.5-3′ high by 1′ wide.  White flowers late spring to summer and plant in full sun.

Gaura, Sisiykou Pink

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Pink flowers late spring to fall.

Gaura, Crimson Butterflies

1.5′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Hot pink flowers in late spring.

Gaillarida (Blanket Flower), Fanfare

1-1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide. Reddish-yellow petals with orange trumpets. Full sun and drought tolerant.

Gaillardia (Blanket Flower), Arizona Sun

.5-1′ high by 1′ wide.  Red centers with yellow edges on the flowers.  Very heat and drought tolerant.

Fern, Shaggy Shield

2′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Dark green fronds with serrated edges.

Fern, Autumn

2′ high by 2′ wide.  New foliage comes out a shinny cooper-pink foliage that turns a green color as it ages.

Fern, Japanese Painted

1-1.5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Silver-grey leaves with a hint of purple centers.  Partial shade is best for color.

Euonymus, Purpleleaf Wintercreeper

.5-1′ high by 5′ wide.  Low growing plant that can climb up objects.  Green foliage in summer to a purple color in fall.  Full sun to part shade.

Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed), Phatom Dwarf

3′ high by 2′ wide.  Purple flowers on green foliage.  Full sun to part sun.

Eupatorium, Little Joe Pye Weed

3-4′ high by 3′ wide.  Dwarf form of Joe Pye Weed.  Green foliage with red-rose flowers in mid-summer.

Eupatorium, Joe Pye Weed

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide.  Green foliage with rose-red flowers in mid-summer.

Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed), Chocolate

3-4′ high by 3-4′ wide.  Burgundy foliage with white flowers in late summer.

Echinacea (Coneflower), White Swan

2-3′ high by 1.5-2′ wide. White flowers in summer. Sun to part shade.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Summer Sky

2-2.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Orange outside and pink inside petals with a reddish cone color.  Full sun to part shade.

Echinaecea (Coneflower), Ruby Star

2-3′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Large dark pink flowers in summer.  Sun to part sun.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Pixie Meadow Brite

2-2.5′ high by 2-2.5′ wide.   Salmon pink flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Pink Double Delight

2′ high by 2′ wide.  Purple petal with a purple cone.  Plant in full sun.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Kim’s Mop Head

1.5-2′ high by 1-2′ wide.  White flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Kim’s Knee High

1.5′-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Pink flowers.  Full sun.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Green Envy

2.5-3′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Green petals on the outside with red on the inside with a dark emerald green cone.  Full sun.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Coconut Lime

2-2.5′ high by 2′ wide.  White flowers around a lite green floret.  Sun to part sun.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Big Sky Sunrise

2-2.5′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Golden yellow flowers.  Full sun to part sun.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Big Sky Sunset

2-2.5′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Reddish-orange flowers.  Sun to part sun.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Big Sky Harvest Moon

2-3′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Orange petals with a deep orange cone in the middle of the flower.  Sun to part sun.

Echinacea (Coneflower), Big Sky After Midnight

1-1.5′ high by 1′ wide.  Dark magenta-purple flowers paired with a black-red cone.  Sun to part shade.

Digitalis (Foxglove), Spanish Peaks

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Short raspberry spike flowers.  Full sun to part shade.

Dicentra (Bleeding Heart), Old Fashioned

3′ tall by 3′ wide.  Comes in either white flowers or pink flowers.  Prefers morning sun and afternoon shade.

Dicentra, (Breeding Heart), Luxuriant

1-1.25′ high by 1-1.25′ wide.  Grayish colored foliage and pink, heart shaped flowers.

Dianthus, Zing Rose

.5′ high by 1′ wide.  Red-rose flowers in summer.

Dianthus, Spangled Star

.5′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Red flowers with pink spots on the pedals.

Dianthus, Frosty Fire

.5′ high by 1′ wide.  Bright red flowers in summer with silvery-green foliage.

Dianthus, Firewitch

.5′ high by .5-1′ wide.  Bright pink flowers in summer.  Dry to moderate soil moisture.

Dianthus, Brilliant

.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Crimson flowers in summer. Full sun.

Dianthus, Bath’s Pink

1′ high by 1-1.5′ wide.  Pink flowers in summer with silver green foliage.

Dianthus, Arctic Fire

.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. White outside and pink inside flowers. Does well in partial sun.

Delphinium, Summer Morning

1′ high by 1′ wide. Pink flowers in summer.  Full sun to part sun.

Delphinium, Dwarf Blue Butterfly

1-1.25′ high by 1′ wide. Blue flowers and full sun to part sun.

Delosperma, Hardy Ice Plant

.5′ high by 1.5′ wide. Pink flowers and plant in full sun with well drained soil.

Coreopsis, Zagreb

1′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. Yellow flowers summer through frost.

Coreopsis, Moonbeam

1′ high by 1-2′ wide. Yellow flowers in summer to frost. Well drained soil and full sun.

Coreopsis, Creme Brulee

.5-1′ high by 1-2′ wide. Golden yellow flowers. Full sun and well drained soil.

Coreopsis, Baby Sun

1.5-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide. Large yellow and rust flower. Full sun and well drained soil.

Coreopsis, Autumn Blush

1.5-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Yellow and red flowers. Well-drained soil and full sun.

Coreopsis, American Dream

1.5-2′ high by1.5′ wide.  Pink and yellow flowers. Well drained soils and full sun.

Chelone, Hot Lips

3′ high by 2′ wide. Full sun plant with rose pink flowers.

Chelone, Turtlehead

2-3′ high by 1′ wide. Flowers in summer witch either comes in pink or white. Plant in full sun.

Ceratostigma, Plumbago

1′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Ground cover that tolerates sun to shade.  Blue flowers with a reddish fall color.

Cerastium, Snow In Summer

.5′ high by 1-2′ wide. White flowers in earlier summer. Whitish foliage.  Prefers dry soil and full sun.

Campanula (Bell Flowers), White Clips

1′ high by 1′ wide. White flowers in early summer to fall.  Full sun to part sun.

Campanula (Bell Flower), Blue Clips

1′ high by 1.5′ wide. Blue flowers. Full sun.

Callirhoe, Purple Poppy Mallow

Less 1′ high by 1-2′ wide. Likes full sun and well drained soils and purple flowers.

Boltonia, Snowbank

3-4′ wide by 3-4′ wide. Full sun, white flowers in fall.

Bergenia, Morning Red

1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide. Shade to part shade. Well drained soil. Reddish flowers.

Bergenia, Cordifolia

1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide.  Bright pink flowers on a plant that likes shade to part shade.

Baptisia, Solar Flare

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. Full sun to part sun. Flowers start out yellow and then fade to orange.

Baptisia, False Blue Indigo

3-4′ high by 3-4′ wide. Full sun to part sun, Well drained soil. Blue-purplish flowers in spring.

Astilbe, Visions In White

1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide. White flowers in summer. Prefers sun to part sun areas.

Astilbe, Visions

1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide. Sun to part sun. Pink flowers in summer.

Astilbe, Sprite

1′ high by 1′ wide. Pink flowers in June/July. Fun sun to part shade.

Astilbe, Sister Theresa

2′ high by 2′ wide.  Salmon flower color in mid summer.

Astilbe, Rheinland

1.5-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide.  Light pink flowers in summer. Prefers partial shade.

Astilbe, Montgomery

1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide. Deep red flowers in mid-summer. Prefers light sun to shade.

Astilbe, Fanal

1.5′ high by 1.5-2′ wide. Red flowers. Prefers light shade and a well drained soil.

Astilbe, Bridal Veil

2-3′ high by 3′ wide. White flowers in summer. Partial shade, prefers morning sun.

Aster, Woods Purple

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. Purple flowers in the fall. Likes to be in full sun.

Aster, Woods Pink

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. Pink flowers in fall. Plant in full sun.

Aster, Woods Blue

1′ high by 1-2′ wide. Purple flowers in the fall.

Aster, Purple Dome

1.5-2′ high by 2-2.5′ wide. Purple flowers in fall.

Aster, Professor Kippenberg

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. Purple-blue flowers in the fall.

Aster, Alert

1-1.5′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. Small palnt with reddish-purple flower color in fall.

Asclepias, Butterfly Milkweed

2-3′ high by 2′ wide. Orange flowers in summer time. Handles dry soils.

Aruncus, Dwarf Goats Beard

.5-1′ high by .5-1′ wide.  Part sun to part shade. Moist to normal soil. White flowers in summer.

Aruncus, Goats Beard

3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Full sun to partial sun. Wet to normal soils condition. White flowers in summer.

Artemesia, Silver Mound

1′ high by 1-2′ wide. Silvery foliage on a plant that does well in full sun and dry soils.

Aquilegia (Columbine), Spring Magic

1′ high by 1-2′ wide. Partial Shade. Flower color is either blue and white (like picture) or Rose and Ivory.

Aquilegia (Columbine), Biedermeier

1′ high by 1.5-2′ wide. Mixed flower color. Handles partial shade .

Anemone, Sylvestris

1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide.  White flowers in summer to fall.  Full sun to partial shade.

Anemone, Robustissima

1-3′ high by 1-3′ wide.  Full sun to partial shade. Pink flowers in summer to fall.

Alchemilla, Lady’s Mantle

2′ high by 2′ wide.  Blooms in late spring to summer. Prefers shade but can handle sun.

Ajuga, Dixie Chip

4-6″ high by 1-2′ wide.  Bluish-purple flowers in late spring. Green, cream, rose variegated foliage.  Full sun to shade.

Ajuga, Chocolate Chip

4-6″ high by 1-2′ wide.  New growth has a chocolate-bronze color to it.  Bluish-purple flowers.  Partial sun to shade.

Ajuga, Catlin’s Giant

10″ high by 2-3′ wide.  Purplish flowers in spring.  Partial sun to shade.  Greenish-burgundy foliage.

Ajuga, Burgundy Glow

4-6″ high by 2-3′ wide.  Bluish flowers in spring time.  Burgundy foliage with some green mixed in.  Partial sun to shade.

Ajuga, Black Scallop

4-6″ high by 2-3′ wide.  Blue flowers in spring time.  Dark burgundy-black foliage.  Prefers partial sun to shade.

Achillea (Yarrow), Moonshine

2′ high by 2′ wide.  Does well in most soils. Yellow flowers in the summer time.

Achillea (Yarrow), Summer Pastels

1.5-2′ high by 2′ wide.  Can handle most types of soils. Can grow in dry to moist soils ( as long as it is well draining). Flowers have a pastel color.

Achillea (Yarrow),Paprika

2′ high by 2′ wide. Handle most types of soil. Can be planted in dry or moist soils (as long as it is well draining). Yellow, orange, and red flower colors.

Sporobolus, Prairie Dropseed

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. This grass has a flopped looked to it. Tolerates dry soils and in rocky sunny areas.

Sorghastum, Indian Grass

3-4′ high by 1-2′ wide.  Flowers are a yellow plumes with several smaller yellow pockets of pollen on a stock.

Schizachyrium, The Blues

2-3′ high by 1.5-2.5′ wide.  Leaves are a blueish tint, that turn a purplish color in the fall.

Schizachyrium, Blaze Little Bluestem

3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide. Upright grass that has a brownish flower top.

Pennisetum, PennStripe

1.5-2′ high by 1.5-2′ wide. Is a thin bladed, white variegated grass that stays low to the ground.

Pennisetum, National Arboretum

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. Black flowers high above the dark green foliage of this grass.

Pennisetum, Little Bunny

1′ high by 1-2′ wide. Small grass with brown plumes on it from summer to fall.

Pennisetum, Karley Rose

3′ high by 2′ wide. Foliage is green and arching with smoky pink plumes in summer to fall

Pennisetum, Hameln

2′ high by 2′ wide. Is a dwarf grass that has brown plumes on it.

Panicum, Shenandoah

3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide. Foliage turns a reddish color in fall.

Panicum, Ruby Ribbons

3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide. Red foliage mixed in with some green foliage.

Panicum, Prairie Sky

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide.  Prefers full sun with well drain soils,but can tolerate different soil types.

Panicum, Northwind

6-7′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Can grow in full sun to partial shade.

Panicum, Heavy Metal

4-5′ high by 3′ wide.  Green-blue foliage with a reddish-purple tint to them.

Panicum, Dallas Blue

4-5′ high by 3-4′ wide.  Blue-green foliage with a dense habit with pinkish flowers that come out in fall.

Molina, Autumn Moor

6-8′ high by 4-6′ wide.  Up right grass that forms around neat clumps.

Miscanthus, Zebra

6-8′ high by 3-4′ wide.  Green and white horizontal variegation.

Miscanthus, Yaku Jima

3-4′ highby 1-1.5′ wide.   Shorter stockier grass with golden plumes on it.

Miscanthus, Variegated Japanese Silver

4-6′ high by 4-6′ wide.  Variegated green and white stripping.  1-2′ plumes.

Miscanthus, Porcupine

5-6′ high by 4′ wide. Horizontal variegation with green and white striping.

Miscanthus Morning Light

4-5′ high by 2-3′ wide. Variegated green and white on a narrow strip.  Reddish flowers that extend past the foliage.

Miscanthus, Maiden Hair

4-6′ high by 3-4′ wide. Silvery-green foliage with brown flowers that go above the foliage.

Miscanthus, Little Kitten

2-3′ high by 1.5′-2′ wide.  Silvery-green narrow leaves. Brown-white flower head.

Miscanthus, Little Zebra

3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide. Dwarf form of Zebra Grass. Yellow and green variegated.

Miscanthus, Gold Bar

3-4′ high by 3′ wide.  Gold bars followed by green bars. Flowers appear above foliage in the fall.

Miscanthus, Dixieland

3-4′ high by 3′ wide. Variegated green and white.

Miscanthus, Cosmopolitan

6-8′ high by3-4′ wide.  Variegated green and white. White fall flowers.

Miscanthus, Autumn Flame

3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide. Green grass that starts to turn an orange-red color in fall. White flower plumes in the fall.

Miscanthus, Adagio

3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide. Green-silver foliage. Flowers come out a pinkish color and turning white.

Juncus, Big Twister

1.5-2′ high by 1-2′ wide. Twisting leaves. Prefers moist soils, full sun to partial shade.

Imperata, Japanese Blood Grass

1-2′ high by 1-2′ wide. Red foliage on the tip of the green leaves.

Hakonechloa, Aureola

2′ high by 2′ wide.  Rich golden flowing foliage in full sun. Foliage has a lime-gold color to it when in the shade locations. Reddish tint in to going in to winter.

Hakonechloa, All Gold

1-2′ high by 1-1.5′ wide. Tolerates shady locations with golden foliage.

Festuca, Elijah Blue Fescue

1′ high by 1′ wide. Blue foliage on a small compact grass.

Erianthus, Hardy Pampas Grass

9-12′ high by 5-6′ wide. Taller grass with larger flowers heads.

Deshampsia, Northern Lights Grass

1-3′ high by 0.5-1′ wide. Grey and gold variegation.  Prefers moist afternoon shade soils.

Chasmanthium, Northern Sea Oats

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. Has flat dropping flowers heads.  They come out green and then turn to a bronze color.

Carex, Ice Dance

12″ high by 24″-36″ wide. White and green variegation. Handles moist woodland or dry shaded soils.

Carex, Ever Gold

12″ high by 18″ wide. Creamy yellow and green variegation. Full to partial sun.

Carex, Bowle’s Golden

12″ high by 12″ wide. Handles moist soils. Yellow leaves with little green variegation.

Calamagrostis, Overdam

4-5′ high by 2-3′ wide. Variegated green and white leaves.  Can handle some shade.

Calamagrostis, Brachytricha

4-5′ high by 3-4′ wide. Green foliage that tolerates dry soils.

Calamagrostis, Avalanche

3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Variegated foliage with green and white stripes.

Bouteloua, Sideoats Grama

24-30″ high by 24-30″ wide. Blue-green foliage, perfers well drain soil.

Andropogon, Big Bluestem

5-6′ high with the flower heads. Flower head looks like a turkey’s foot. Light red fall color. Likes a well drain soil.

Acorus, Variegated Sweet Flag

24″ high by 15″ wide.  Golden foliage with green variegation. Handle moist soils.

Hemlock, Canadian

40-50′ high by 25-35′ wide.  Evergreen tree that can handle shade.

Arborvitae, Emerald Green

12′ high by 3′ wide.  Narrow upright evergreen with soft foliage.

Arborvitae, Degroot’s Spire

10′ high by 2′ wide. Tight, narrow upright evergreen with soft foliage.

Fir, Douglas

50′ high by 15′ wide. Good specimen or used as mass groupings.

Pine, Wates Golden

20-40′ high by 10-30′ wide. Golden needles on a pine tree.

Pine, White

60′ high by 30′ wide. Pine tree with softer needles and is a faster growing pine tree.

Pine, Columnar White

Another one of my favorite tree’s!  This is a nice fairly narrow pine, attaining 40′ high by 10-15” wide.  Soft needles, and a quick grower. Good for a small area in the landscape.

Pine, Ponderosa

60′ wide by 30′ wide. Can be used as a specimen or mass plantings or screening. Can handle drier soils.

Pine, Japanese White

25′ wide by 10′ wide.  A bluish-green needles on an open growing pine tree.

Pine, Austrian

50′ high by 25′ wide. Can be as a good specimen or used for mass plantings or screening.

Pine, Arnold’s Sentinel

25′ high by 5′ wide. A smaller, narrower version on Austrian Pine.

Pine, Vanderwolf

A truly beautiful Pine tree!  This choice soft needled Pine has a blue green foliage (needle).  The tree is smaller in size than the Eastern White Pine, allowing it to fit in the smallest of yards where an evergreen is desired.  An approximate size of 20′ high by 12′ wide should be expected.

Spruce, Glauca Slenderina

Height depends on how high the stake is on the plant. Bluish needles on pendulous branches.

Spruce, Hoopsii

I love this spruce!  Bluest of the blue’s in my opinion.  A narrower strain of the Blue Spruce family, attaining 30′ high by 15′ wide.  It’s shape is as times irregular when young, that is in part why we like to start with properly punned specimens of 6′ and greater.

Spruce, Fat Albert

15′ high by 10′ wide.  A smaller selection of the Blue Spruce.

Spruce, Colorado

50′ high by 20 wide.  Broad pyramidal evergreen.  Colors can vary between green to blue.

Spruce, Columnar Blue

20′ high by 5′ wide. Columnar spruce with a bluish tint on the needles.

Spruce, Serbian

50′ high by 20′ wide.   A bluish-green needles on pendulous branches.

Spruce, Riverside

40′ high by 10′ wide.  A narrow form of Serbian Spruce.

Spruce, Bruns

35′ high by 10′ wide.  A tall and narrow evergreen.

Spruce, Black Hills

25′ high by 10′ wide.  A smaller evergreen that can tolerant dry soils.

Spruce, Weeping White

25′ high by 5′ wide.  Narrow spruce that can be used in smaller areas.

Spruce, Weeping Norway

Height depends on how high the staking is done. Weeping pendulous that cover the whole tree.

Spruce, Norway

50′ high by 25′ wide. A pyramidal tree that has pendulous branches as it gets older.

Spruce, Wellspire

25′ high by 5′ wide. A columnar Norway Spruce.

Spruce, Clanbrassiliana

5′ high by 5′ wide. This is a dwarf form of Norway Spruce.  Takes about 10 years to reach full growth.

Juniper, Wichita Blue

18′ high by 4′ wide. Upright juniper with a bluish foliage.

Juniper, Talyor

18′ high by 3′ wide.  Upright evergreen with grey-green foliage.

Juniper, Spartan

15′ high by 3′ wide.  A dense evergreen that can be used for screening.

Juniper, Skyrocket

15′ high by 2′ wide. A narrow juniper that could be used as a vertical screen. Blue-greenish foliage.

Calamagrostis, Karl Foerster

4-5′ high by 2-2.5′ wide.

Yucca, Color Guard

3′ high by 3′ wide. Yellow and green variegated spiky leaves.

Yucca, Adam’s Needle

3-4′ high by 3′ wide. White flower spikes in summer. Spiky leaves.

Weigela, Wine and Roses

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide. Dark purple-burgundy foliage with red flowers.

Weigela, My Monet

2′ high by 2′ wide.  Pinkish-purple flowers with a variegated pink, green and white foliage.

Weigela, Minuet

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. Reddish-pink flowers withgreenish foliage.

Weigela, Midnight Wine

1′ high by1.5′ wide. Dark purple-burgundy foliage with deep pink flowers.

Weigela, Java Red

3-4′ high by 3-4′ wide. Green foliage with a deep pink flower.

Weigela, Dark Horse

2′ high by 3′ wide. Dark black-burgundy leaves with pink flowers.

Viburnum, Wentworth American Cranberry

10-12′ high by 10-12′ wide. White flowers in spring followed by red fruit. Red fall color.

Viburnum, Newport Dwarf

4′ high by 4′ wide. White flowers in spring that look like snowballs. Burgundy fall color.

Viburnum, Nannyberry

15-20′ high by 8-10′ wide. White flowers in spring followed by blue-black fruit. Purplish-red fall color.

Viburnum, Mohican

6-8′ high by 6-8′ wide. White flowers in spring followed by red-black fruit. Reddish fall color.

Viburnum, Korean Spice

5-8′ high by 5-8′ wide. Pinkish flowers that has a strong fragrance. Red-wine fall color.

Viburnum, Juddii

6-8′ high by 6-8′ wide. Light pink flowers in spring  followed by red-black fruit. Purplish fall color.

Viburnum, Dwarf European Cranberrybush

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Rarely flowers.

Viburnum, Chicago Lustre

8-10′ high by 8-10′ wide. White flowers in spring followed by blue fruit. Reddish-purple fall color.

Viburnum, Burkwood

8-10′ high by 6-7′ wide. White flowers followed by red-black fruit. Red-wine fall color.

Viburnum, Blue Muffin

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide. White flowers in spring followed by blue fruit.  Reddish fall color.

Viburnum, Black Haw

10-12′ high by 8-10′ wide. White flowers in spring followed by red-black fruit. Reddish fall color.

Viburnum, Autumn Jazz

10-12′ high by 8-10′ wide. White flowers in spring followed by blue-black fruit. Yellow-red fall color.

Viburnum, Bailey Compact

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide. White Flowers in spring, followed by red fruit. Reddish fall color.

Lilac, Tinkerbelle

5-6′ high by 4-5′ wide. Deep Pink flowers in spring.

Lilac Miss Kim

6-8′ high by 5-6′ wide. Lilac color flowers in spring.

Lilac, Dwarf Korean

3-5′ high by 4-5′ wide. Lavender flowers in spring.

Lilac, Common Purple

12-15′ high by 8-10′ wide. Purple flowers in spring. Could be used as a hedge.

Coralberry, Hancock

2-3′ high by 4-5′ wide. Whitish flowers followed by pink berries. Good plant for ground cover.

Spirea, Vanhoutte

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide. White flowers in spring.

Spirea, Norman

2′ high by 2′ wide. Pink flowers in summer.

Spirea, Neon Flash

3′ high by 3′ wide. Red flowers in summer.

Spirea, Magic Carpet

1.5-2′ high by 2′ wide. Pink flowers in summer. New growth comes out reddish and then turns a yellow foliage.

Spirea, Little Princess

2′ high by3′ wide. Pink flowers in summer.

Spirea, Japanese White

1-2′ wide by 1-2′ wide. White flowers in summer with darker green foliage.

Spirea, Golden Elf

.5′ high by 1.5′ wide. Pink flowers on a tiny plant.

Spirea, Gold Mound

2′ high by 2′ wide. Pink flowers in summer. Yellow foliage all year long.

Spirea, Gold Flame

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. Pink flowers in summer. New growth comes out a reddish color and then changes to yellow foliage.

Spirea, Daphane

1′ high by 2′ wide. Pinkish flowers in summer.

Spirea, Anthony Waterer

3′ high by 4′ wide. Pinkish flowers in summer.

Willow, Dwarf Arctic Blue

5′ high by 5′ wide.  Blue-green leaves, good plant for moist soils.

Willow, Hakuro Nishiki

6′ high by 6′ wide. Green and white foliage, can also be trained on tree form.

Rose, Ramblin’ Red Climber

Climbing rose with red  recurrent blooms.

Rose, White Meidiland

2′ high by 4′ wide. White ever-blooming flower.

Rose, Purple Pavement

3′ high by 3′ wide. Purple reblooming flowers.

Rose, Nearly Wild

3′ high by 3′ wide. Pink ever-blooming flower.

Rose, Homerun

3′ high by 3′ wide. Red ever-blooming flower.

Rose, Chuckles

3′ high by 3′ wide. Pink ever-blooming flower.

Rose, Champlain

3′ high by 3′ wide. Deep red ever-blooming flower.

Rose, Pink Knockout

3′ high by 3′ wide. Ever-blooming pink flower.

Rose, Knockout

3′ high by 3′ wide. Ever-blooming red flower.

Rose, Double Knockout

3′ high by 3′ wide. Double ever-blooming deep red flower.

Rose, Flower Carpet White

1.5′ high by 2′ wide. Ever-blooming white flower.

Rose, Flower Carpet Yellow

1.5′ high by 2′ wide. Ever-blooming yellow flower.

Rose, Flower Carpet Red

1.5′ high by 2′ wide. Ever-blooming red flower.

Rose, Flower Carpet Pink

1.5′ high by 2′ wide. Ever-blooming pink flower.

Rose, Livin’ Easy

2′ high by 2′ wide.  Ever-blooming apricot color flower. Needs mulch on it for winter protection.

Rose, Easy Going

2′ high by 2′ wide. Reblooming yellow flower.

Rose, Yellow Submarine

2′ high by 3′ wide. Reblooming yellow flower.

Rose, Pink Pearls

2′ high by 3′ wide.  Pink recurrent blooming flowers.

Rose, Paint The Town

2′ high by 3′ wide.  Red ever-blooming flower.

Rose, Coral Cove

2′ high by 3′ wide. Apricot flowers with a yellow center.

Rose, All The Rage

2′ high by 3′ wide. Apricot ever-blooming flower.

Sumac, Tiger Eyes

6′ high by 6′ wide. Golden cut leaves that turn orange-scarlet fall color.

Sumac, Smooth

10′ high by 10′ wide.  Greenish flowers to red cone fruit. Larger shrub with reddish fall color.

Sumac, Gro-Low

2-3′ high by 4-5′ wide.  Good mass planting shrub. Orange-red fall color. Aromatic foliage.

Rhododendron, Ramapo

3′  high by 4′ wide. Dwarf Compact shrub with purplish color flowers.

Rhododendron, PJM

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide. Shade plant that needs good drainage. Lavender blooms in spring.

Rhododendron, Nova Zembla

4′ high by 4′ wide. Shade plant that needs good drainage. Dark pink to red flowers in spring.

Buckthorn, Fine Line

5-6′ high by 2-3′ wide. Small verison of Fernleaf Buckthorn.

Buckthorn, Fernleaf

10-15′ high by 8-10′ wide.  Fern leaf look to foliage.

Buckthorn, Columnar

12-15′ high by 4-5′ wide.  Upright shrub.

Sandcherry, Purpleleaf

6-8′ high by 6-8′ wide. Pinkish flowers in spring with purplish foliage.

Sandcherry, Pawnee Buttes

1.5-2′ high by 3-4′ wide.  White flowers in spring, red-purple fall color.

Potentilla, Gold Finger

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. Yellow flowers on a hardy shrub.

Ninebark, Summer Wine

4′ high by 4′ wide. White flowers and reddish-purple leaves.

Ninebark, Diabolo

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide.  Whitish flowers, with reddish foliage color.

Ninebark, Dart’s Gold

4-6′ high by 4-6′ wide. Pinkish flowers. Gold foliage with a reddish fall color.

Ninebark, Center Glow

8′ high by 10′ wide.  White flowers in spring. Foliage comes out yellow-green and then turns to a red color.

Mahonia, Oregon Grape Holly

4′ high by 4′ wide. Evergreen shrub with glossy green leaves that look like holly leaves.  Yellow flowers in spring.  Prefers shady locations.

Mahonia, Compact

2′ high by 3′ wide. Compact shrub with glossy green leaves and yellow flowersin spring.

Honeysuckle, Dropmore Scarlet

15′ high vine.  Fast growing vine with orangish-red flowers from summer to frost.

Honeysuckle, Goldflame

Up to 15′ high. Multicolor bloom that are yellow, orange, and red from summer to frost.

Ligustrum, Golden Vicary Privet

4′ high by 4′ wide.  Compact shrub that has yellow-green foliage.

Lagerstromeia, Crapemyrtle ‘Red Filli’

1.5′ high by 1.5′ wide. Bright red flowers summer to frost.

Itea, Little Henry’s Garnet Sweetspire

1.5-2′ high by 2-3′ wide. White flowers in spring with some fragrance to them. Scarlet fall color.

Itea, Henry’s Garnet Sweetspire

3-5′ high by 3-5′ wide. White flowers in spring with some fragrance to them. Scarlet fall color.

Ilex, Shamrock Compact Inkberry

3-4′ high by 3-4′ wide. Small evergreen globe shaped plant. White flowers that do not produce any fruit.

Ilex, Red Sprite Winterberry

2-3′ high by 3′ wide. Female plant to go with Jim Dandy Winterberry. Small Compact shrub with red berries in fall.

Ilex, Jim Dandy Winterberry

3-5′ high by 3-5′ wide. Male plant to mix with Red Sprite Winterberry.

Ilex, China Boy & China Girl Combo

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide. This plant has both male and female flowers on it. There for it has red berries on it in winter time.

Ilex, China Girl Holly

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide. Hardy broad-leaf, evergreen. It is the female plant to the China Boy Holly. With out both plants you can not get the red fruit. The Female has red berries on it in winter.

Ilex, China Boy Holly

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide. Hardy broad-leaf, evergreen. It is the male plant for the China Girl Holly. With out both plants you can not get the red fruit on the China Girl Holly.

Ilex, Berri-Magic

6′ high by 3′ wide. This Ilex is a self pollinator, which means that you don’t need a male and female to get the red berries.

Hypericum, Sunburst

2′ high by 2′ wide. Yellow-golden flowers in summer.

Hypericum, Mystical Beauty

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Yellow flowers that have pinkish color berries in the fall.

Hypericum, Ames St. Johns Wort

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Yellow flowers in summer. Low growing shrub.

Hydrangea, Climbing

Climbing form of Hydrangea with white flower.

Hydrangea, Pink Diamond

6-8′ high by 6-8′ wide. Blooms come out white and change to a pink color.

Hydrangea, Sikes Dwarf Oakleaf

2-3′ high by 3-4′ wide. Dwarf form of Oakleaf Hydrangea. Does well in part shade to full shade.

Hydrangea, Pee Wee Oakleaf

3′ high by 3′ wide. Dwarf form of Oakleaf Hydrangea.

Hydrangea, Oakleaf

4-6′ high by 4-6′ wide.  Plant gets it’s name from the shape of the leaf, which looks like an oak leaf. Prefers shade. White to Whitish-pink blooms in summer.

Hydrangea, Nikko Blue

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide. Blue prolific blooms.

Hydrangea, Limelight

6-8′ high by 6-8′ wide. Lime-green panicles that turn a pinkish color in the fall.  This is a prolific bloomer.

Hydrangea, Late Panicle (Tardiva)

6-8′ high by 6-8′ wide. White to pink flowers in a pointed cluster.

Hydrangea, Glowing Embers

3′ high by 3′ wide. Pinkish-red blooms in summer.

Hydrangea, Endless Summer

3′ high by 3′ wide. This hydrangea is the first to bloom on old and new wood. It has pink blooms in alkaline soils and blue blooms in acidic soils.

Hydrangea, Blushing Bride Endless Summer

3′ high by 3′ wide. Blooms white, with a pinkish hue in the center of the bloom, in summer. Has same qualities as Endless Summer.

Hydrangea, Annabelle

4-5′ high by 3′ wide. White flowers in summer. Plant likes partial shade.

Hibiscus Althea, White Chiffon

8′ high by 8′ wide. Summer blooming, up-right shrub with reddish flowers.

Hibiscus Althea, Red Heart

8′ high by 8′ wide. Summer blooming, up-right shrub with white flowers that have red centers.

Hibiscus Althea, Blue Bird

8′ high by 8′ wide. Summer blooming, up-right shrub with lavender-blue flowers.

Fothergilla, Mt. Airy

5′ high by 4′ wide.  White flowers in spring. Reddish-orange fall color.

Fothergilla, Dwarf

2-3′ high by 2′ wide. Creamy white flowers in spring. Foliage green that changes to a scarlet fall color.

Fothergilla, Blue Mist

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Fragrant white flowers in spring. Bluish-green foliage for a partial shaded area.

Forsythia, Northern Gold

6-8′ high by 6-8′ wide. Yellow flowers in early spring.

Forsythia, Gold Tide

2-3′ high by 3-4′ wide. Yellow flowers in early spring. Tends to sprend more than Bronxensis Forsythia, but stays as low to the ground.

Forsythia, Bronxensis

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. Yellow flowers in early spring. Bronze fall color. Compact, low growing shrub.

Lighted home

Look at the curb appear gained through outdoor lighting, not to mention safety and security are addressed.

Pergola – Lighted with water feature

Outdoor structures add so many options to the outdoor environment.  Here we have a covered structure with lighting and a water feature.  Lots of interest, what a great way to whine down at the end of a hectic day.

Petersan – Corner planting

Nice little corner planting with stone elements.

Lighted pillars and flagstone

Castle wall pillars with accent lighting on Black Hills Supreme flagstone.

Klement – Re-working a problem area with too much slope

Initially, they were thinking turf.  In the end, a dry creek with landscaping to stabilize the bank became a more plausible answer.  This dry creek bed handles hard rains, channeling excess water through both turf areas and landscaped sections.

 

Low voltage lighting in woodland setting

Low voltage lighting adds so much to the landscape environment.  Lets face it, we all work, when do we have the time to enjoy our labors it’s not during the evening.  Lighting allows us to extend that window of enjoyment, there by making it worth every penny!

Nice dry creek bed

The key to a truly natural look is to use a proper mix of stones.  One doesn’t see only river rock in a creek bed.  An assortment of small to large stones rewards the customer with a pleasing, excellent representation of a real creek bed.  Placement of stones is important as well, one needs to have an eye for it.  It’s taken us a lot of years to develop that eye for detail.

Euonymus, Frost Pearl

5′ high by 2-3′ wide. Deep green foliage that has white margins. Tiny white clusters of berries around leaf nodes.

Euonymus, Emerald N’ Gold

2′ high by 4′ wide.  Yellow margins on the edge of a glossy leaf, that turn a pinkish-red fall color.

Duncan – After picture of dry creek bed installation

We installed a dry creek bed and additional drainage.  It added to the landscaping and fixed a problem.  On many projects now a days we add short dry creek beds at key gutters. We find it improves the overall look of the landscaping and aids with drainage.

Duncan – A before picture of a drainage problem.

This was another technical project for Landmark Landscapes.  Our customer continued to have water seepage in their basement.  Standard drainage proceedures were utilized to no avail.  In the end, a special group was formed consisting of various specialists and an engineer, with Landmark Landscapes being a player in this process.  We unfortunately, had to tear out an existing pavered walkway, boulders, lighting, and landscaping trees, shrubs and perennials.  The picture merely shows how we lowered the entire front yard by close to 24″.  With the grade down past the level where the house essentially sat on the poured foundation, the seepage ended.  Do to the grade change we were forced to come up with a plan that allowed for an attractive entry while still allowing easy flow of water from the home.  We came up with a sunken grotto effect.  The trees, shrubs and most of the perennials were saved and taken care of at our nursery, while construction ensued.  Do to the lay out and grade changes a bridge was required.  We wanted to re-utilize the pavers as well and this became a challenge as well, since we needed a bridge of concrete and steel for ridgidity.  In the end, most of the initial landscape was reutilized and the main water issues were fixed.

Natural stone wall with steps and curves.

Tastefully done natural stone wall with steps.

Bouldered terraces and landscaping

A hill side done in boulders and plantings makes an attractive, interesting addition to any slope.

Euonymus, Emerald Gaiety

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide.  Green foliage with white margins, that turn a pinkish in the winter time.

Dwarf Burning Bush

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide. Best known for it’s fall red color.

Daphine, Carol Mackie

3-4′ high by 3-4′ wide. Pink flowers in spring.  Semi-evergreen foliage with delicate cream-edged leaf margins.

Cotoneaster, Tom Thumb

1-2′ high by 2-3′ wide. It’s a smaller cotoneaster. NOTE: Easily gets drowned out.

Cotoneaster, Cranberry

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide.  Pink flowers in June, red berries to follow.  Red fall color with berries lasting into the winter.

Smokebush, Royal Purple

8-10′ high by 8-10′ wide. Purple foliage with red to purple fall color.

Smokebush, Grace

10-15′ high by 10-15′ wide.  Hugh pink flower panicles over the shrub.  Light red leaves in summer to red, orange, yellow in fall.

Walking Stick, Harry Lauder’s

6-8′ high by 4-6′ wide.  Curly-twisted stems.

Dogwood, Red Twig

8-10′ high by 8-10′ wide.  Large shrub that has red twigs in winter time. White flowers followed bywhitish berries.

Dogwood, Kelsey Dwarf

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. A compact dogwood.  Red stems in the winter time.

Dogwood, Ivory Halo

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide. Variegated foliage, and red twigs in the winter time.

Dogwood, Isanti

5-6′ high by 5-6′ wide.  White flowers followed by white berries. Reddish purple fall color. Red twigs in winter time.

Dogwood, Grey

6-8′ high by 6-8′ wide.  White flowers in spring followed by white fruit on red stems.  Purplish-red fall color.

Summersweet, Ruby Spice

3-5′ high by 3-5′ wide.  Bright pink flowers in the summer time.

Summersweet, Pinkspires

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide. Pink flowers in summer time.

Summersweet, Hummingbird

3-4′ high by 3-4′ wide. White flowers in summer.

Caryopteris, Sunshine Blue

3-4′ high by 3-4′ wide. Goldish-green foliage. Bluish flowers in late summer.

Caryopteris, Dark Knight

2-3′ high by 2-3′ wide. Grey-green foliage and dark blue flowers in late summer.

Beautyberry, Issai

2-4′ high by 2-4′ wide.  Pinkish-white flowers that turn into purple berries.

Butterfly Bush, Royal Red

6-8′ high by 6-8′ wide. Reddish flowers in summer.

Butteryfly Bush, Petite Plum

3-4′ high by 3-4′ wide. Smaller shrub, with smaller leaves and flowers. Purple flowers in summer.

Butterfly Bush, Nanho Purple

4-6′ high by 4-6′ wide. Purple flowers in summer.

Butterfly Bush, Nanho Blue

4-6′ high by 4-6′ wide. Mauve-blue flowers.

Butterfly Bush, Black Knight

6-8′ high by 6-8′ wide. Dark purple flowers in summer.

Barberry, Royal Burgundy

1-2′ high by 2-4′ wide. Burgundy color foliage.

Barberry, Rosy Glow

4-6′ high by 4-6′ wide. Purple-red foliage.

Barberry, Helmond’s Pillar

3-4′ high by 1-2′ wide. Purple-red colored foliage.

Barberry, Compact Crimson Pygmy

2′ high by 2-3′ wide. Deep red burgundy foliage.

Barberry, Bonanza Gold

2′ high by 2′ wide. Golden foliage. Small rounded shrubs.

Azalea, White Lights

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide. White flowers in spring.

Azalea, Western Lights

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide. Lighter pink flowers in the spring.

Azalea, Rosy Lights

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide. Rosy pink flowers in the spring.

Azalea, Orchid Lights

3′ high by 3-4′ wide. Orchid color flowers in spring.

Azalea, Mandarin Lights

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide. Mandarin-orange flowers in spring.

Azalea, Golden Lights

4-5′ high by 4-5′ wide. Golden flowers in the spring.

Chokeberry, Viking Black

3-5′ high by 3-5′ wide. White flowers in spring followed by black fruit. Red fall color.

Chokeberry, Iriquois Beauty

2-3′ high by 4-5′ wide. White flowers in spring followed by black fruit.  Red fall color. Smaller sized Black Chokeberry.

Chokeberry, Glossy Black

4-6′ high by 4-6′ wide. White flowers in spring followed by black fruit which stays through the winter. Green Leaves that turn to red-orange color.

Chokeberry, Brilliant Red

6-8′ high by 4-5′ wide.  White flowers in spring. Red fruit to follow.  Red fall color. An upright plant.

Chokeberry, Autumn Magic

3-5′ high by 3-4′ wide. White flowers in spring. Black fruit. Glossy green leaves. Excellent fall color from red to purple.

Fir, Concolor

40-50′ high by 15′ wide. Has bluish-green foliage.

Fir, Blue Cloak

Height varies for each plant. Weeping growth habit.

Viburnum, Nannyberry (Tree Form)

15-20′ height by 8-10′ wide. White flowers in spring. Black fruit in summer. Purple-red fall color.

Elm, Triumph

55′ high by 45′ wide. Resistant to Dutch Elm Disease.

Elm, Pioneer

50′ high by 60′ wide. Resistant to Dutch Elm Disease. Yellow fall color.

Elm, Accolade

70′ high by 40′ wide. Resistant to Dutch Elm Disease.  Good yellow fall color.

Linden, American

50-75′ high by 35-40′ wide.  Pyramidal tree with larger leaves. Yellow flowers in spring time. Yellow fall color.

Linden, Greensprire

40-50′ high by 30′ wide. Pyramidal tree shade. Yellow spring flowers.  Yellow fall color.

Bald Cypress

50-70′ high by 30-35′ wide.  Has fine texture leaves.  Has a yellowish-brown fall. Can handle both dry and wet soils.

Lilac, Ivory Silk

20-25′ high by 15′ wide.  White flowers in early summer. More compact than Japanese Tree Lilac. Has cherry like bark.

Lilac, Dwarf Korean (Tree Form)

5-10′ high by 5′ wide. (Height can vary) Globe tree on standard. Lavender blooms. Has cherry like bark.

Willow, Weeping

50′ high by 50′ wide.  This willow is a weeping, spreading tree and has yellowish bark.

Oak, Swamp White

50-60′ high by 45′ wide. Does well in moist soils as well as dry soils. Yellow, red, brown fall colors.

Oak, Regal Prince

50′ high by 20′ wide. Columnar shape with dense foliage.

Oak, Northern Red

60-80′ high by 45′ wide. Faster growing oak tree, darker green leaves that turn reddish-brown in the fall. Tends to hold on to it’s leaves into the winter.

Oak, Crimson Spire

45′ high by 15′ wide. Columnar type tree that has a crimson red fall color.

Oak, Chinkapin

40-50′ high by 50′ wide. Chinkapin is drought tolerate and tolerates alkaline soils.  Yellow, orange, and brown fall colors.

Oak, Burr

60-80′ high by 60′ wide.  Burr Oak has cork bark and a brownish purple fall color.

Pear, Cleveland Select

35-40′ high by 15′ wide. White flowers in spring. Reddish fall color.

Pear, Aristocrat

30-35′ high by 25′ wide. White flowers in the spring.  Red to purple fall color.

Cherry, Snow Fountain

12-15′ high by 12-15′ wide. Weeping tree with white flowers.

Plum, Newport

20′ high by 20′ wide. Pink flowers in the spring, purplish foliage in summer.

Prunus virginiana ‘Canada Red’ Cherry

20-25′ high by 20′ wide. Foliage comes out green at first then changes to a  reddish-maroon color.

Aspen, Quaking

50′ high by 25′ wide. Comes as a clump or a single stem tree. The leaves flutter in the wind. Has a greenish-grey bark. Has a bright yellow fall color.

Cottonless Cottonwood

50-60′ high by 40′ wide. Cottonless cottonwood tree faster growing.

London Planetree

50-60′ high by 40′ wide.  Whitish, grey, brown exfoliating bark.  Hugh shade tree. Has 1″ ball like fruit.

Weeping Mulberry

15′ high by 15′ wide.  Weeping habit tree.

Crab, Weeping Red Jade

12′ high by 12′ wide. Pink flowers in spring that fade to a white flower. Then followed by red fruit.  This is a weeping crabapple tree.

Crab, Sugar Tyme

18′ high by 15′ wide. White flowers in spring by followed by red fruit.

Crab, Spring Snow

15-20′ high by 15′ wide. White flowers in spring. Does not produce fruit.

Crab, Snowdrift

20-25′ high by 20′ wide. White flowers followed by orange-red fruit.

Crab, Sargent Tina

5′ high by 5′ wide. White flowers followed by red fruit. Dwarf tree.

Crab, Sargent

6′ high by 10′ wide. White flowers followed by dark red fruit.

Crab, Red Baron

18′ high by 10′ wide. Red flowers followed by red fruit.

Crab, Prairiefire

15-20′  high by 15′ wide. Red Flowers in spring followed by maroon fruit.

Crab, Pink Spire

15-20′ high by 10-12′ wide. Pink flowers in spring followed by red fruit.

Crab, Indian Summer

15-20′ high by 15′ wide. Red-pink flowers in spring followed by red fruit.

Crab, Donald Wyman

20′ high by 20′ wide. White flowers in the spring followed by red fruit.

Crab, Coralburst

8-10′ high by 10-12′ wide. Pink flowers in the spring followed by red-orange fruit.  Compacted tree.

Malus ‘Adirondack’ Crabapple

15-20′ high by 10′ wide. White flowers in the spring, followed by orange-red berries.

Magnolia, Royal Star

8-10′ high by 8-10′ wide. White flowers in spring before the leaves emerge.

Magnolia, Jane

10′ high by 10′ wide. Reddish-purple flowers in the spring before the leaves emerge.

Magnolia, Butterflies

20′ high by 15′ wide. Up right pyramidal tree, with yellow flowers in the spring.

Tulip Tree

70-90′ high by 35-40′ wide. Has green, yellow, orange tulip like flowers in late spring. Has a golden fall color.

Kentucky Coffee Tree

50-60′ high by 40′ wide.  Has fruit pods that average 8″ long and are brown.

Locust, Shademaster

50-60′ high by 35-40′ wide. Good drought tolerant tree.

Locust, Sunburst

35-40′ high by 35′ wide.  Golden foliage.

Locust, Skyline

45′ high by 35′ wide.  Yellowish fall color.

Ginkgo, Jade Butterflies

12-15′ high by 8-10′ wide. Slow going specimen tree. Golden yellow fall color.

Ginkgo, Princeton

40′ high by 15′ wide. Upright tree. Golden fall color.

Ash, Patmore

45′ high by 35′ wide.  Yellow  fall color. NOTE: Is susceptible to the ash borer which can cause the tree to die.

Ash, Autumn Purple

45′ high by 40′ wide.  Does have a purple fall color.  NOTE: Is susceptible to the ash borer which can cause the tree to die.

Hawthorn, Thornless

15′ high by 15′ wide. White flowers in June. Red fruit after and into winter.

Dogwood, Pagoda

15′ high by 20′ wide. Has a horizontal growth habit. White flowers in spring. reddish fall color.

Dogwood, Cornelian

20′ high by 15′ wide. Yellow spring flowers. Red fruit later in summer.

Dogwood, Kousa

20′ high by 15′ wide. White flowers in spring.  Red fruit adds little interest in winter time.  Scarlett fall color.

Dogwood, Cherokee Chief Florida

15′ high by 12′ wide. Red flowers, good under-story tree. Can handle partial shade.

Redbud, Eastern Alba (Whitebud)

20-25′ high by 20′ wide. White flowers in spring  before leaves emerge. Yellowish fall color.

Redbud, Lavender Twist

5′ high by 10′ wide. Lavender-pink flowers in the spring.  Good specimen tree with an umbrella canopy.

Redbud, Eastern

20-30′ high by 20′ wide. Purple flowers in early spring before leaves emerge. Yellowish fall color.

Hackberry Nipple Gall

Does no harm to the tree. Real easy way to identify Hackberry.

Hackberry

50-60′ high by 50′ wide.  Drought hardy tree. Has corky bark. Yellowish fall color. Also known to have Hackberry Nipple Gall.

Hornbeam, Columnar

35′ high by 25′ wide.  Dense, formal looking tree. Good for screening. Yellow fall color.

Birch, Whitespire

35′ high by 25′ wide. White bark with green leaves. Has a resistance to the birch borer.

Birch, Renaissance

60′ high by 35′ wide.  Green leaves with a pyramidal shape

Birch, Royal Frost

30′ high by 15′ wide.  Nice burgundy foliage with a whitish trunk.

Serviceberry, Shadblow

25′ high by 15′ wide. White flowers in the spring. Orange/yellow fall color. Perfers moist soils

Serviceberry, Autumn Brilliance

20′ high by 15′ wide. White blooms in the spring, purplish fruit in the summer, and a red fall color. Seen as a clump and a single stem tree.

Maple, State Street

35′ high by 20′ wide. Yellowish fall color.

Maple, Sienna Glenn

60′ high by 40′ wide. Red/orange fall color.

Maple, October Glory

40′ high by 35′ wide. Crimson-reddish fall color.

Maple, Legacy Sugar

50-60′ high by 35′ wide. Fall color is a reddish.

Maple, Green Mountain Sugar

45′ high by 35′ wide. A good shade tree with a reddish-orange fall color.

Maple, Fall Fiesta Sugar

50′ high by 50′ wide. A good shade tree with a great fall color of orange, red and yellow.

Maple, Emerald Lustre

40′ high by 40′ wide. Yellowish fall color.

Maple, Debroah Norway

45′ high by 40′ wide. New growth comes out red then changes to a green foliage with a yellowish/gold fall color.

Maple, Crimson Sentry

25′ high by 15′ wide. Compact tree with purplish foliage.

Maple, Dissectum Japanese

8-10′ high by 5′ wide. Purplish lace foliage.

Maple, Red Sunset

30-40′ high by 25-35’wide.  Excellent, reliable fall color.

Maple, Autumn Blaze

40-50′ high by 30′ wide. Nice scarlet fall color.

Maple, Amur ‘Flame’

20′ high by 20′ wide. Small tree with reddish-orange fall color.

Maple, Armstrong

45′ high by 15′ wide. Nice columnar tree that has a yellowish-orange fall color.

Maple, Japanese

10-15′ high by 15′ wide. Small accent tree with purplish foliage all season long.

M. Benes – Curved retaining wall w/steps

A curved retaining wall with lighted steps.

M. Benes – Fire pit

Here we utiilized two different colored retaining wall blocks which she already had on hand.  The intent was to create a sunked fire pit area which offered additional seating.  How did we do?

M. Benes – Patio or Chess?

Mary was a great customer with some fun ideas.  Our role was to implement those ideas into a user friendly, sustainable landscape environment.  This is one of many activity centers in her back yard.  Large chess pieces allow kids to actually utilize this space for a quick interactive game of chess.

M. Benes – Cobble around the pool

Here we chose to utilize cobble stone around the pool to minimize the mulch which could blow into the pool.  The cobble tends to keep large dogs out of the beds as well not to mention I think it’s a nice and unique alternative to standard issue river rock.

Nollendorfs – After picture front yard

The look today with minor additions in 2009′.  Planters and boulders add nice character and seasonal interest.

Nollendorfs – A before picture front yard

Here is a picture of what we started with some 5 years ago.

Natural stone wall with curves

Here is a nicely done natural stone wall.  It has nice curves, and functional steps that complement the wall materials.  The plantings choosen use a scale that compliments the wall well.

Matthews – After construction, hardscaping, landscaping and lighting.

We built a custom deck and gazebo using Trex.  Incorperated tumbled pavers into the landings below each set of steps.  Low voltage lighting throughout the structure and landscaping ensured extended enjoyment even into the evening hours.  We were blessed to come accross these customers who now utilize all of our services.

Matthews – A before picture prior to construction

This project began as a deck and gazebo but grew into much more.

Klement – Project before and after pictures.

Here is what we began with on this project.  Little do I know at present but this is going to turn into a turn key project for us.  First in, last out… we inevitably walk this project right through all phases of construction.

M. Benes – Limestone chip makes a wonderfull playground base

This project covered all sorts of outdoor projects.  The picture here shows how easily a playground can come to life in your own backyard when the right materials are utilized.  Here we incorporated .25″ limestone base material through out the playground area.  We vibratory plated the limestone so as to create a hardened surface.  We also introduced a climbing area for the kids made out of natural limestone boulders and low maintenance plants for additional interest.

Deumic – Castle wall and Holland pavers

Here we addressed not only the drainage issues but also added a nice sitting area and landscaping.  We used standard Holland pavers and Castle wall block to create a more open airy feel.  The deck was expanded upon and resurfaced with a composite product “Trex”.  Multiple levels were created.  Wire’s wereran throughout the project to allow for easy lighting installation later in life.  A dry creek bed and hidden drain tile direct water away from the house now.  All in all, a nice practical addition to an existing yard.

Limestone wall and steps

Here is an example of 12″ Limestone wall block and 6-8″ Limestone steppers.

Milbourn – Upper pond with Cranes

Here is one of my first ponds believe it or not. We used Windridge boulders as our stone, this is just a portion of the pond, in all we used some 70,000 lb’s of boulders.

Pavers

Tumbled pavers add class and maintain that rustic feel.  Here is a link to a local provider of pavers Outdoor Solutions and the parent company Belgard which manufactures them.  Be sure to look through Belgards web site.  You will fins a wealth of useful ideas and information.

Zysset – Granite bouldered waterfall

Granite creates a natural look to any stream or pond.  Granite is also resistant to freeze and thaw damage unlike Colorado Moss Rock.

Fire pit – Glacial Granite Boulders

Here is an example of a fire pit using glacial granite stones or field stone.  They can be as simple as a campfire or more complex using fire rings and mortar such as some of these.  Your tast is the final say.

Birch, River

30-40′ high by 20-30′ wide. Reddish brown bark. Has a resistance to the birch borer.

HELLO MY NAME IS MARK CHARIPAR

Mark started his career in horticulture by working for Earl May and later, Campbell’s Nursery in Lincoln while attending college.  He received a BS in Horticulture with an emphasis in Business Administration and Landscape Design from the University of Nebraska.  His experience at Earl May and Campbell’s Nursery provided him with a solid foundation in the landscape industry. 

 In 1995, he moved back to his hometown of Columbus, Nebraska, and started his own business.  Landmark Landscapes consists of several divisions:  landscape design/installation, maintenance, retail, and wholesale.  The various divisions employ approximately 15 full-time and 5 part-time employees. In 1997, he founded the Home Enhancement Center, which consists of Landmark Landscapes and its gift shop.  Four complimentary companies, Mueller Sprinklers, The Lawn Surgeons, No-Sweet Fencing, and Foreman Construction are also located in the Home Enhancement Center.  In 1999, he purchased the franchise, Brite Ideas, making him an exclusive distributor of Christmas lighting for the Columbus and Norfolk areas.

 In 2006, he moved back to the Lincoln area taking Landmark Landscapes with him and brought on a new business partner, enter Kasey Olson.  Together they have grown the company quickly, and enjoy a large customer base which has scene some challenging and rewarding landscaping projects.

 Mark is a Nebraska Certified Nurseryman and a member of the Nebraska Nursery and Landscape Association.  Mark’s goal is to increase the perceived value of landscaping in the marketplace by demonstrating creativity, professionalism, and world-class customer-service.