Outdoor Living

An outdoor courtyard

Here you have a charming outdoor courtyard effect.  Segmented block, pavers, color and contour, comprise the finished product.


Castle Wall Hearth and Railing

Here is an example of Castle Wall Block application in the landscape.  In this photo, we utilized Castle Wall Block to build both a hearth and railing that can be used as a sitting wall.


Deumic – Castle wall and Holland pavers

Here we addressed not only the drainage issues but also added a nice sitting area and landscaping.  We used standard Holland pavers and Castle wall block to create a more open airy feel.  The deck was expanded upon and resurfaced with a composite product “Trex”.  Multiple levels were created.  Wire’s wereran throughout the project to allow for easy lighting installation later in life.  A dry creek bed and hidden drain tile direct water away from the house now.  All in all, a nice practical addition to an existing yard.


FIRE PITS AND FIRE PLACES – LINK

Hello folks here is a great link to many of the fire pits and or fire places offered here in the Lincoln area.  If you see something you like contact Outdoor Solutions or us if a complete turn key installation is in order.  Another option would be to go directly to  Belgard’s website.  You will find many idea’s and options for your dream yard get away!

 


Hobbs – Pergola with swing and screen

Here Landmark Landscapes combined some construction skills with landscaping skills to package a nicely landscaped patio and pergola.  The pergola was built out of Cedar and was beefed up to handle additional weight from the swing.  It’s not visible but we actually have a steel beam built into this pergola so we new it could handle an additional 400 lb’s or so.


Outdoor living space, where does it start and stop?

I searched the internet to find the perfect definition of an outdoor living space, and to my surprise I came up short, even Wikipedia left me hanging.  In my opinion, creating an inviting outdoor living space is similar to that of changing your house into a home.  They both require an investment of time and materials. They both require the owner to personalize the space.  Some of the adverbs I’d utilize to describe this place would be, comfortable, welcoming, functional, interesting,… etc.  Establishing such takes ability, creativity, experience, and a personal investment in the effort (a.k.a “time and money”).  This definition includes both you and the people doing the work.

Outdoor living can consist of both structural and natural elements.  The tactful combination of these elements determines the overall success of the project.  Structural elements that come to mind include but are not limited to a pergola, deck, outdoor furniture, grill, patio, fire pit, hearth, etc.  Natural elements would be plantings, lighting, contours, fragrance, water, stone, sound, etc.  The outdoor living space is not to be confused with an outdoor kitchen.  An outdoor kitchen is simply structural elements in combination with the needed appliances to cook outdoors.   Therefore the outdoor living space may include an outdoor kitchen but is not limited to having one.  A growing trend in residential landscaping is that of placing more emphasis into the outdoor living space.  This is perhaps one of the most cost effective home improvements.

Improving your home is always a good investment. In the current economic environment, people are staying home.  Adding to your home’s value is smart, it positions you well if ever decide to sell your home as it makes your home more marketable.  At the same time, it improves your way of life and adds to your overall health and well being by placing you in direct contact with the outdoors.


Tennity – A beginning… there was turf?

Here is what we started with in July. A basic back yard with a large expanse of turf and limited landscaping. The Tennity’s had quite the check list of needs. Our plan covered most of them, and we added a few additions along the way to bring the entire project together. To date this has been my toughest back yard renovation and most rewarding. I’ve learned a great deal from this project. Namely, with the right equipment, planning, and motivation, anything is possible.


Tennity – After pictures.

Here are some after installation photos.  Note:  the color both in bloom and foliage.  Contrast is everywhere, and bold distinctions abound through this landscape.  We installed a retaining wall for the elevation changed to accommodate the pool.  As you can see we added a dry creek bed to eliminate trapped water.  Then we installed a flagstone path to the golf course.


Walsh – Bring the camp fire to you!

Here we added a nice area right off the house that allows for a nice fire.  You can cook out or just enjoy a nice evening by the fire with this cozy hardscape.


Walsh – One year later

Our first picture was taken in November 0f 09′, this one is one year later to the date.


Williams – Project before and afters

Privacy was gained through the installation of large trees, some topping out at 4″ caliper. We also utilized grade change through berming and boulder work to elevate our plantings. Elevation change also aided us in providing our customer with a nice water feature. Hardscaping in the form of pavers and castle wall added additional usable space to the back yard. A natural gas fire pit was installed to take the chill out of those cold Nebraska nights. Lastly, we installed lighting on both the landscaping, hardscaping, and the house itself. Here we did our best to better life for this uprooted Mizzu fan. May your ship sail strong on this ever present sea of red.


Zysset – Project after pictures

This project is filling in nicely wouldn’t you say.   This was a major renovation, with essentially most of the back yard being torn out.  We worked around the large trees, contracted concrete experts to weave the sidewalk and steps through the landscape down the slope.  The deck was added using composit materials for durability.  A sound system was built into the landscape as construction ensued, lighting was also built into the project.  This picture just doesn’t do the project justice, you just have to be there and interact with the space to have a feel for how much is going on!